Support Us

Now, more than ever, we need your support to advance feminist law reform and promote women’s equality rights.

Here are the different ways you can support our work.

Donating to the National Association of Women and the Law Charitable Trust for Research and Education

In 1983, the National Association of Women and the Law Charitable Trust for Research and Education (the NAWL Charitable Trust) was established to complement NAWL’s advocacy work. As a registered charity, the Trust prepares and disseminates research and education on legal issues concerning all aspects of the social, economic and political life of Canadian women. It assists in the protection of women’s civil rights and liberties by charitable means, as well as in the relief of poverty.

The NAWL Charitable Trust is a registered charity and relies solely on the generous donations of individuals and grants to fund its work. Charitable tax receipting is available.

Charitable registration number: 14083 5885 RR0001.

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Leaving a gift in your will

Many of our supporters have been with us since NAWL was founded in 1974 — and their steadfast commitment to protecting and promoting women’s equality rights in Canada continues to inspire the work we do today.

These supporters often choose to kindly remember NAWL or the NAWL Charitable Trust with a legacy gift.

Frequently asked questions

A legacy gift is when an individual wants to designate part of their estate in the form of a planned future gift to a non-profit or a registered charity.

The most popular way to leave a legacy gift is to make a bequest in your will. A bequest is an instruction that a certain amount of money, a particular item of property or the residue of your estate once your other bequests are made should be given to NAWL or the NAWL Charitable Trust at your death. Upon death, NAWL or the NAWL Charitable Trust will issue a receipt for the bequest. A bequest to the NAWL Charitable Trust may result in significant tax savings.

Seek professional help from a legal advisor with experience preparing wills to make sure your wishes are honoured. Make sure when drafting your will that our full name (National Association of Women and the Law) is included — we may not receive your gift otherwise.

Seek professional help from a legal advisor with experience preparing wills to make sure your wishes are honoured. Make sure the Trust’s full name (National Association of Women and the Law Charitable Trust for Research and Education) and charitable registration number (14083 5885 RR0001) is included in your will. We may not receive your gift otherwise.

Here are a few clauses for you and your lawyer to consider including in your will:

To give a specific amount to NAWL, which is a not-for-profit organization (not tax-receiptable):I give to the National Association of Women and the Law, 234 St. Patrick Street, Ottawa, Ontario, the sum of $10,000”

To give a specific amount to the NAWL Charitable Trust, which is a registered charity (tax receiptable): “I give to the National Association of Women and the Law Charitable Trust for Research and Education, charitable registration number 14083 5885 RR0001, 234 St. Patrick Street, Ottawa, Ontario, the sum of $10,000.”

To give a percentage of the estate: “I give to [the National Association of Women and the Law OR the National Association of Women and the Law Charitable Trust for Research and Education] fifty percent (50%) of the rest, residue and remainder of my estate.”

To give a specific asset, such as shares in a company: “I give to [the National Association of Women and the Law OR the National Association of Women and the Law Charitable Trust for Research and Education] 500 shares of ABC Co. Inc.”

You can also give a gift contingent upon the occurrence of a condition. For instance, “In the event that my brother does not survive me, I give to [the National Association of Women and the Law OR the National Association of Women and the Law Charitable Trust for Research and Education].”

We are here to help.  For more information about creating a gift in your will, please get in touch. And if you have chosen to include us in your will, please contact us and let us know—we would really like to thank you personally!

Click here if you’d also like to learn more about how to gift RRSPs or RRIFs.

Gifting Stocks and Securities

The most tax effective way to give.

If you own publicly traded securities that have increased in value since you purchased them, using them to make your charitable donations is the most tax effective way to give. You may donate publicly traded securities, stocks and bonds as well as mutual funds held in a non-registered investment account by transferring them “in-kind” to the National Association of Women and the Law Charitable Trust for Research and Education.

Frequently asked questions

“In-kind” means that you do not sell the security and transfer cash as your gift. Rather your securities are transferred to a NAWL Charitable Trust brokerage account and the NAWL Charitable Trust sells them. If you sell them first, you will pay tax on 50% of the capital gain.

You will then receive a charitable receipt from the NAWL Charitable Trust for the full market value of the securities on the day the NAWL Charitable Trust receives the “in-kind” transfer and you pay no tax on the capital gain.

You can only donate securities that are held in a non-registered investment account. Always donate stocks, bonds or mutual funds with the greatest capital gain because this will save you the most tax.

For more about how to gift RRSPs or RRIFs, click here.

You can ask your financial institution to provide you with a third-party transfer form or charitable donation form.

Or download, complete and sign our Securities Transfer Form for publicly traded securities and your financial advisor will initiate the transfer for you.

It is our policy to sell the shares immediately upon receipt and convert the shares to cash. Upon receipt of the transferred securities, the NAWL Charitable Trust will issue a charitable tax receipt based on the full market value of the securities on the day it receives the “in-kind” transfer (the closing bid price on that day). The transfer of shares can take a few days, or weeks in the case of mutual funds, please allow up to 4 weeks for this process to be completed.

Click here to learn how to donate stocks & securities through your will, and here to learn how to donate stocks & securities in addition to your RRSPs and RRIFs.

Donating RRSPs or RRIFs

You can designate the National Association of Women and the Law or the National Association of Women and the Law Charitable Trust for Research and Education as a full or partial beneficiary of your Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) or Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF).

The tax burden can be considerable for registered funds, such as RRSPs and RRIFs. When someone dies, it is as if they cashed in their assets all at once and it is added to their taxable income. Generally, the largest tax hit on an estate is for the remaining balance of an RRSP or RRIF on the death of a spouse, because the Canada Revenue Agency treats this as income in the year of death.

When this happens, this means the estate could be taxed at the highest income rate. This could be more than 50 per cent when probate fees are added.

Donating your RRSPs or RRIFs would eliminate this tax—but it does require careful planning. Donors should seek independent legal and/or accounting advice when considering a gift funded from RRSP/RRIF assets to ensure that they are not caught unaware of the tax implications of such gifts.

Frequently asked questions

It is possible to use the charitable tax credit to offset tax on withdrawal while the donor is living.  When you withdraw funds from an RRSP, your financial institution withholds the tax. The rates depend on your residency and the amount you withdraw. For residents of Canada outside of Quebec, the RRSP withdrawal rates are:

  • Under $5000, it is 10%.
  • Up to $15,000, it is 20%.
  • Over $15,000, it is 30%.

If you are living in Quebec, or aren’t a Canadian resident, please speak with your financial institution as the rates differ.

To note, a probate or executor is not needed to facilitate this type of gift given the donor is still living.

Giving your RRSPs or RRIFs later can allow you access to the funds throughout the donor’s lifetime while also reducing the tax burden on the Estate.

Designating NAWL or the NAWL Charitable Trust as a direct beneficiary of your RRSP or RRIF protects the RRSP or RRIF from being subject to estate administration taxes (probate fees) or executor fees because it does not go through your Estate. Beneficiaries can be named directly on your RRSP/RRIF, with the option of listing multiple beneficiaries.

To note, for direct beneficiary designations the value of the eligible charitable gift receipt will be the value of the gift on the date of death.

It may be possible to avoid having tax withheld from the withdrawal from an RRSP/RRIF if you complete a T1213 (A Request to Reduce Tax Deductions at Source). This is particularly beneficial for larger donations.

Your financial institution or an accountant can help complete the necessary paperwork. While it can take several weeks for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to process the form, once approved and provided to the financial institution holding the RRSPs/RRIFs, the financial institution would not be required to withhold an amount in respect of tax and the full amount of the withdrawal may be transferred to the registered charity.

As with all significant gifts to a charity, careful planning is required to realize the maximum impact of the donation. Donors should seek independent legal and/or accounting advice when considering a gift funded from RRSP/RRIF assets to ensure that they are not caught unaware of the tax implications of such gifts.

Volunteering

We need your help to continue building a feminist law reform network in Canada. Reach out to learn more about the different ways you can help push our movement forward.