Reforms to Custody and Access / Réformes à la garde et l’accès

Reforms to Custody and Access
Réformes à la garde et l’accès
When the Minister of Justice announced his intention to introduce changes to the Divorce Act, he considered abandoning the concepts of custody and access in favour of notions such as “shared parenting” or “parental responsibility”. NAWL urged him to proceed with the utmost caution in his proposed reforms to family […]
Lorsque le ministre de la Justice a annoncé son intention de présenter des modifications à la Loi sur le Divorce, il envisageait la possibilité d’abandonner les notions de garde et de droit de visite en faveur de notions comme la « coparentalité » ou la « responsabilité parentale ». L’ANFD lui a […]

When the Minister of Justice announced his intention to introduce changes to the Divorce Act, he considered abandoning the concepts of custody and access in favour of notions such as “shared parenting” or “parental responsibility”. NAWL urged him to proceed with the utmost caution in his proposed reforms to family law in regards to the care and responsibility for children after divorce.

Honourable Martin Cauchon
Minister of Justice
284 Wellington St.
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada K1A 0H8

October 25, 2002

Re: Custody and Access

Minister Cauchon,

In August, you announced your intention to introduce changes to the Divorce Act and to abandon the concepts of custody and access. The National Association of Women and the Law urges you to proceed with utmost caution in your proposed reforms to family law in regards to the care and responsibility for children after divorce.

This line of reforms has been tried in other countries – in the U.K., Australia and in many U.S. states – and has been shown to be ineffective to bring about real change in favour of collaborative parenting. However, these reforms have been shown to subject women to constant contact and negotiations with their ex-spouse, and to control and coercion by those men who wish to use the law and the legal system as a tool of woman abuse.

Abandoning the language of custody and access, in favour of expressions such as “shared parenting” or “parental responsibility” will also have many negative consequences on the interpretation of the federal Child-Support Guidelines, and it will no doubt be used to reduce or eliminate child-support payments to women. It will also be the source of extensive litigation over the meaning of parental responsibility, its day to day exercise, and the specific parameters of the care and control that each parent is expected to exercise in regard to the child. In addition, abandoning the language of custody and access will create confusion in regards to the interpretation of international treaties protecting children from abduction, such as the Hague Convention.

We fear that this type of reform will further entrench women’s inequality in the family and make women more vulnerable to coercion and violence. As we have recommended in a brief that NAWL developed in collaboration with the Ontario Women’s Network on Child Custody and Access in June 2001, violence against women must be an overriding consideration in all aspects of family law, and every case before the family courts must be examined for the possible existence of violence and/or coercive control. Research has shown that in too many cases, the existence of violence against women does not come to light. Therefore, developing special or separate rules to deal with cases involving violence will not be effective.

We are alarmed that you never mention in your public statements the need to respect and promote the equality interests of women, despite the fact that many women’s organizations across Canada have been urging you to do so. Paying attention to women’s equality is essential to the effective promotion of children’s best interests. As the Supreme Court of Canada has repeatedly stated, the government is constitutionally required by section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms to specifically address the impact that a law may have on women’s equality rights. As Justice Claire L’Heureux-Dubé wrote in Willick, the Divorce Act must be interpreted in a way that is “sensitive to equality of result as between the spouses”.

NAWL also considers that the guiding criteria in decisions on custody and access after divorce must be the best interests of the children. The “rights” of the fathers should not be the paramount consideration, and fathers do not always have a “right” to equal access to and responsibility for a child. Nevertheless, many judges and legal professionals already seem to believe that this is so, and decisions are being taken daily in our courts that are simply not in the best interests of the children. They are doing this despite the fact that Justice L’Heureux Dubé reminded the courts in Young that they need to be “conscious of the gap between the ideals of shared parenting and the social reality of custody and childcare decisions”. This is why NAWL recommends that the best interests of the child test be explicitly defined in the Divorce Act and that a provision defining the guiding principles that should be referred to when interpreting the Act, be included. We believe that this is the only way to ensure that the safety, security and well-being of the child, and the child’s caregiver, be fully taken into consideration, and that the Divorce Act be interpreted according to the principles of substantive equality.

When we met with you in June 2002, you expressed a desire to include references to equality in the Divorce Act, as well as specifying the criteria that should be used to interpret the “best interests of children” test. Subsequent to this meeting, NAWL has asked its Working Group on Family Law to explore these questions, and we are now sending you the analysis and recommendations of the Working Group, appended to this letter.

NAWL recommends that a Preamble of the Divorce Act clearly acknowledge:

• the historic gendered division of labour and responsibilities within the family, as well as ongoing systemic discrimination against women;
• the importance of ameliorating the position of women in the family as well as in society;
• the importance of ensuring that the Act does not entrench or exacerbate the existing disadvantage of women;
• the importance of ensuring that the Act respects and promotes women’s equality rights, and in particular women’s rights to safety, autonomy and dignity.

NAWL also recommends that the following principles guide the interpretation of the Act:

• This Act must be interpreted and administered so that the safety and well-being of children and of children’s caregivers is of paramount importance.
• The history of caregiving responsibilities when the family was intact is relevant to the capacity of parents to assume parenting responsibility upon divorce.
• Children and caregivers should be protected from situations that generate a climate of coercion or fear.
• Contact between children and non-residential parents is to be encouraged but not when there is a climate of coercion or fear.
• Shared decision-making and/or shared residence are not appropriate in high conflict cases or cases involving a history of abuse.
• Day-to-day decisions should normally be made by the parent with whom the child resides.

Finally, NAWL suggests the following list of factors in assessing the best interests of the child:

• the paramount importance of ensuring the safety and well-being of the child and the child’s caregivers.
• the practical realities of the child’s life, including primary care, whether both parents have a relationship with the child, and whether there is a climate of coercion, violence and fear.
• whether a parent has demonstrated responsible parenting in the past.
• the importance of continuity in the child’s care.
• the quality of the relationship the child has with a parent and the effect of maintaining that relationship.
• the quality of the relationship between the parents, taking into account that conflict between parents diminishes the benefits to children of contact.
• a history of family violence, which contraindicates custody or unsupervised contact with the abuser.
• a history of high conflict or family violence, which contraindicates shared decision-making or shared residence orders.
• the diverse realities and parenting practices of families in Canada, and the child’s cultural and racial heritage.
• the child’s views where it can be clearly ascertained that the child has not been manipulated, threatened or otherwise coerced.

We trust that you will take these into consideration, and that you will ensure that law reform options that your Ministry will put forward effectively promote children’s best interests, by guaranteeing women’s substantive equality rights.

Finally, we wish to reiterate what NAWL has stated in past correspondence, that it is essential that proper measures be put in place to ensure that women have access to justice, and that they be able to obtain legal representation. A substantial increase in federal government funding for legal aid, with a special fund for civil legal aid and family law matters, would be one concrete way for your department to show its commitment to the substantive equality rights of women. We also reiterate NAWL’s request that you convene a national consultation of equality-seeking women’s groups to discuss law reform in this area, and hope that you will agree to organize such an event in the near future.

Yours truly,

Susan B. Boyd
Professor, Faculty of Law, University of British Columbia
On behalf of NAWL’s Working Group on Family Law

cc. :

The Rt. Honourable John Chrétien
Prime Minister of Canada

Hon. Jean Augustine
Secretary of State (Multiculturalism) (Status of Women)

The Honourable Ethel Blondin-Andrew
Secretary of State (Children and Youth)

The Honourable Anne McLellan
Minister of Health

Dr. Carolyn Bennett, MP

Michel Bellehumeur
Justice Critic, Bloc Québécois

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie
Justice Critic, NDP

Peter Gordon
Justice Critic, Progressive Conservative

Diane Bourgeois Status of Women Critic
Status of Women Critic, Bloc Québécois

Judy Wasylycia-Leis
Status of Women Critic, NDP

Libby Davies
Children and Youth Critic, NDP

Paul Crete
Children and Youth Critic, Bloc Québécois

Lorsque le ministre de la Justice a annoncé son intention de présenter des modifications à la Loi sur le Divorce, il envisageait la possibilité d’abandonner les notions de garde et de droit de visite en faveur de notions comme la « coparentalité » ou la « responsabilité parentale ». L’ANFD lui a conseillé de procéder avec la plus grande précaution dans les réformes proposées en ce qui a trait aux soins et à la responsabilité des enfants après le divorce.

L’Honorable Martin Cauchon
Ministre de la Justice
284, rue Wellington
Ottawa (Ontario)
Canada K1A 0H8

Objet : Garde et droit de visite

Monsieur le ministre Cauchon,

Au mois d’août, vous avez annoncé votre intention de présenter des modifications à la Loi sur le divorce et de mettre au rancart les notions de garde et de droit de visite. L’Association nationale de la femme et du droit vous recommande instamment de procéder avec la plus grande précaution dans ces réformes envisagées en ce qui a trait aux soins et à la responsabilité des enfants après le divorce.

Ce genre de réformes a été tenté dans d’autres pays – au Royaume Uni, en Australie et dans beaucoup d’États américains – et a démontré son inefficacité à entraîner une évolution réelle au plan de la collaboration parentale. Au contraire, il a été démontré que ces réformes exposent les femmes à de constants contacts et négociations avec leur ex conjoint et au contrôle et à la coercition exercés par ceux de ces hommes qui souhaitent exploiter la loi et le système juridique comme instruments de violence à l’égard des femmes.

Abandonner les notions de garde et de droit de visite en faveur d’expressions comme la « coparentalité » ou la « responsabilité parentale » aura également beaucoup de répercussions négatives sur l’interprétation des Lignes directrices fédérales de pensions alimentaires pour enfants, et sera certainement utilisé pour réduire ou éliminer les pensions alimentaires pour enfants qui sont versées aux femmes. Ce sera aussi la source de litiges interminables sur le sens de la responsabilité parentale, son exercice quotidien et les paramètres exacts des soins et de l’autorité que chaque parent est appelé à exercer face à l’enfant. Enfin, l’abandon des notions de garde et de droit de visite provoquera la confusion quant à l’interprétation de traités internationaux protégeant les enfants du rapt, comme la Convention de La Haye.

Nous craignons également que ce type de réformes viendra renforcer l’inégalité des femmes dans la famille et rendra les femmes plus vulnérables à la coercition et à la violence. Comme nous l’avons recommandé en juin 2001 dans un mémoire rédigé par l’ANFD en collaboration avec le Réseau des femmes ontariennes sur la garde légale des enfants, la violence faite aux femmes doit devenir une considération primordiale et prioritaire dans tous les aspects du droit de la famille, et l’on doit être attentif à tout indice de violence ou de contrôle dans l’examen de chacun des cas soumis aux tribunaux de la famille. Des recherches ont établi qu’il est, hélas, très courant que la violence infligée aux femmes ne soit pas divulguée. C’est dire que la création d’une réglementation spéciale ou différente pour traiter les cas de violence ne pourra constituer une solution efficace.

Nous sommes particulièrement inquiètes de ne jamais vous entendre mentionner, dans vos déclarations publiques, la nécessité de respecter et de promouvoir les droits des femmes à l’égalité, malgré les nombreuses invitations en ce sens que vous ont adressées beaucoup d’organisations regroupant des Canadiennes. L’attention portée à l’égalité des femmes est pourtant essentielle à une promotion efficace de l’intérêt supérieur des enfants. Comme l’a déclaré à plusieurs reprises la Cour suprême du Canada, le gouvernement a l’obligation constitutionnelle, aux termes de l’article 15 de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, de tenir expressément compte de l’impact que peut avoir une loi sur les droits des femmes à l’égalité. Comme l’a écrit Madame la juge L’Heureux Dubé dans l’arrêt Willick, la Loi sur le divorce doit être interprétée d’une façon « sensible à l’égalité de résultat entre les conjoints ».

L’ANFD considère également que c’est l’intérêt supérieur des enfants qui doit être le critère déterminant des décisions rendues sur la garde et le droit de visite après le divorce. Les « droits » du père ne doivent pas être la considération primordiale, et les pères n’ont pas toujours un « droit » d’accès égal à un enfant ou de responsabilité égale pour lui ou pour elle. Toutefois, beaucoup de juges et de professionnel le s de l’appareil judiciaire semblent déjà croire qu’il en est ainsi : des décisions sont prises quotidiennement dans nos tribunaux qui dérogent réellement à l’intérêt supérieur des enfants. Les professionnel le s prennent ces décisions en dépit du rappel de la juge L’Heureux Dubé, dans l’arrêt Young, que « les tribunaux doivent, à mon sens, être conscients de l’écart entre l’idéal du partage des tâches parentales et la réalité sociale des décisions en matière de garde et de soin des enfants ». Voilà pourquoi l’ANFD préconise que le critère de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant soit explicitement défini dans la Loi sur le divorce et que la loi inclue une disposition établissant les principes directeurs auxquels se référer dans l’interprétation de cette législation. Nous considérons que c’est la seule façon de s’assurer de bien prendre en considération la sûreté, la sécurité et le mieux être de l’enfant et de la personne qui lui prodigue les soins et de garantir que la Loi sur le divorce soit interprétée conformément aux principes de l’égalité matérielle.

Lorsque nous vous avons rencontré, en juin 2002, vous avez exprimé le souhait d’inclure des références à l’égalité dans la Loi sur le divorce, et de spécifier les critères à utiliser dans l’interprétation du critère de « l’intérêt supérieur des enfants ». À la suite de cette rencontre, l’ANFD a mandaté son Groupe de travail sur le droit de la famille à explorer ces enjeux, et vous trouverez joint à la présente le document d’Analyse et de recommandations rédigé par notre groupe de spécialistes.

L’ANFD recommande qu’un Préambule à la Loi sur le divorce reconnaisse clairement :

  • la division genrée historique du travail et des responsabilités au sein de la famille, ainsi que la discrimination systémique qui demeure imposée aux femmes;

  • l’importance d’améliorer la position des femmes aussi bien au sein de la famille que de la société;

  • l’importance de veiller à ce que la Loi n’enchâsse ni n’exacerbe le désavantage actuel des femmes;

  • l’importance de veiller à ce que la Loi respecte et favorise les droits des femmes à l’égalité et, en particulier, les droits des femmes à la sécurité, à l’autonomie et à la dignité.

L’ANFD préconise également que les principes suivants guident l’interprétation de la Loi :

  • Cette loi doit être interprétée et administrée de façon à prioriser la sécurité et le mieux être des enfants et de leur principal dispensateur de soins.

  • L’histoire des responsabilités de pourvoi des soins lorsque la famille était intacte est pertinente à la capacité de chaque parent d’assumer des responsabilités parentales au moment du divorce.

  • Les enfants et leurs dispensateurs de soins doivent être protégés des situations qui suscitent un climat de coercition ou de crainte.

  • Les contacts entre les enfants et les parents non résidents doivent être encouragés mais pas en présence d’un climat de coercition ou de crainte.

  • Le partage des décisions ou de la résidence n’est approprié ni dans les situations très conflictuelles ni dans les situations marquées par des antécédents de sévices.

  • Les décisions quotidiennes devaient normalement être prises par celui des parents chez qui réside l’enfant.

Finalement, l’ANFD suggère que le critère de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant soit évalué conformément aux facteurs ci dessous :

  • l’importance essentielle d’assurer la sécurité et le mieux être de l’enfant et de ses dispensateurs de soins

  • les réalités pratiques de la vie de l’enfant, y compris les soins de première ligne, la présence ou non d’une relation de chacun des parents à l’enfant et celle d’un climat de coercition, de violence ou de peur

  • la démonstration ou non d’un comportement parental responsable par le passé

  • l’importance de la continuité dans les soins à l’enfant

  • la qualité de la relation de l’enfant avec un parent et l’effet de préserver cette relation

  • la qualité de la relation entre les parents, en tenant compte du fait que le conflit entre les parents réduit les avantages des contacts pour les enfants

  • des antécédents de violence familiale, une contre indication à l’attribution de la garde ou de visites non supervisées à l’agresseur.

  • des antécédents de conflits élevés ou de violence familiale, une contre indication au partage des décisions ou aux ordonnances de résidence partagée

  • la diversité des réalités et des pratiques parentales des familles vivant au Canada et l’héritage racial ou culturel de l’enfant

  • les opinions de l’enfant lorsqu’on peut déterminer clairement que l’enfant n’a pas été manipulé, menacé ou autrement forcé.

Nous espérons que vous tiendrez compte de ces considérations et que vous vous assurerez que les options de réforme du droit proposées par votre ministère feront une promotion efficace de l’intérêt supérieur des enfants en garantissant les droits des femmes à l’égalité matérielle.

Enfin, nous tenons à réitérer ce que vous a dit l’ANFD lors d’envois précédents, à savoir qu’il est essentiel de mettre en place des mesures appropriées pour assurer aux femmes l’accès à la justice et l’obtention des services d’un e avocat e. Une hausse substantielle du financement fédéral des mesures d’aide juridique, y compris un fonds spécial pour les dossiers d’aide juridique civile et de droit de la famille, serait une façon concrète pour votre ministère de démontrer son engagement envers les droits des femmes à l’égalité matérielle. Nous réitérons également l’appel lancé par l’ANFD à ce que votre ministère convoque sans délai une consultation nationale des groupes de femmes soucieux d’égalité pour discuter des réformes juridiques envisagées dans ce domaine, et nous espérons que vous accepterez d’organiser une telle activité dans un avenir prochain.

Veuillez agréer, Monsieur le Ministre, l’expression de ma plus haute considération.

Susan B. Boyd
Professeure, Faculté de droit, Université de la Colombie Britannique
Au nom du Groupe de travail de l’ANFD sur le droit de la famille

Copies conformes :

Le Très honorable Jean Chrétien
Premier ministre du Canada

L’Hon. Jean Augustine
Secrétaire d’État (Multiculturalisme) (Condition féminine)

L’Hon. Ethel Blondin Andrew
Secrétaire d’État (Enfance et jeunesse)

L’Hon. Anne McLellan
Ministre de la Santé

Dr Carolyn Bennett, députée

Michel Bellehumeur
Critique en matière de Justice, Bloc Québécois

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie
Critique en matière de Justice, NPD

Peter Gordon
Critique en matière de Justice, Parti Progressiste conservateur

Diane Bourgeois
Critique en matière de Condition féminine, Bloc Québécois

Judy Wasylycia Leis
Critique en matière de Condition féminine, NPD

Libby Davies
Critique en matière d’Enfance et de jeunesse, NPD

Paul Crête
Critique en matière d’Enfance et de jeunesse, Bloc Québécois

Susan Boyd
[9] [open-letters-lettres-ouvertes-au-gouvernement] Open Letters / Lettres ouvertes au gouvernement
to-honourable-martin-cauchon-regarding-custody-and-access
155
reforms-to-custody-and-access
Divorce Act, Divorse Act, custody, access, child custoday, shared parenting, parental responsibility