Addressing Trafficking in Women and Children in Canada

Cet article est disponible uniquement en anglais. Trafficking in women and girls is a significant global problem to which Canada is unfortunately not immune. It is an illegal yet highly profitable industry, which recruits, transports and sells human beings for the purpose of exploiting their labour and/or their sexuality. The victims of trafficking are overwhelmingly…

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World March of Women Plans Worldwide Action in 2005

Cet article est disponible uniquement en anglais. The World March of Women (WMW) is a global network for feminist action that had its genesis in the Quebec women’s movement. WMW focuses on struggles against poverty and violence against women. In 2000, the WMW carried out a series of national actions including popular education, national marches…

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Custody and Access: An Update on Bill C-22

On February 2003, Bill C-22, An Act Amending the Divorce Act was debated in the Second Reading in the House of Commons, and sent to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. In March, the Committee invited the Minister of Justice Martin Cauchon to present the Bill. He faced tough questions from the Canadian…

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National Consultation on Transgender and Women’s Substantive Equality

NAWL organized a national consultation on transgender and women’s substantive equality rights, held in Ottawa on February 22 and 23, 2003. The consultation drew representatives from rape crisis centres, women’s equality-seeking groups, unions, government, transgender and transsexual (trans) advocates, and other interested individuals from across Canada. The specific objective for the weekend was to lay…

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The Live-In Caregiver Program: Inequality Under Canada’s Immigration System

The Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP) is a specialized program of Citizenship and Immigration Canada, which admits participants to Canada as temporary workers for up to three years. In exchange for completing 24 months of care giving work for children, the elderly, or the disabled in a private household within three years of arriving in Canada,…

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The Impact of the Anti-Terrorism Act

In the aftermath of the horrifying events of 9/11, the government of Canada introduced Bill C-36. It was far-reaching: an omnibus bill, cobbled together in haste while the country was still in a state of shock and crisis, bordering on hysteria. As Calvin White (Ottawa Citizen, Oct. 15/01) wrote, Canada was shocked to the core…

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Same-Sex Hearings

At the hearings held in Sudbury on April 9, 2003, NAWL appeared before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights to present our views on the question of whether the federal government should recognize same-sex marriages. We urged the committee members not to be swayed by political and social prejudice and stereotyping born of…

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Agency and Urgency: An Advocacy Project on the Defence of Provocation

As a student of Women’s Studies, a worker at a shelter for abused women and a black woman who witnessed violence in my life, I believe the Provocation Defence is a blatant injustice to women. Honourable Minister, our beloved country has fought long and hard to establish laws, which recognize a woman as a person.…

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Winners of the NAWL’s Trust 16th Essay Competition

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 16th Annual Essay Competition organized by NAWL’s Charitable Trust for Research and Education: First prize ($750): The Impact of Globalization on Social Programs in Canada: Gender, Social Reproduction and Benefits for Maternity and Parental Leave by Gillian Calder Sponsored by Stikeman Elliott, Toronto, ON Second prize…

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Coalition of Stolen Sisters

NAWL is a member of the National Coalition for our Stolen Sisters, led by the Native Women’s Association of Canada. To date, other member organizations include the Canadian Research Institute on the Advancement of Women (CRIAW), Womenspace, the Canadian Federation of University Women, the Women’s Legal Education Action Fund (LEAF), and the Mother of Red…

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Walsh v. Bona

Releasing its decision in Walsh v. Bona on December 19, 2002, the majority of the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that it is not discriminatory for the Nova Scotia Matrimonial Property Act (MPA) to exclude common law couples from the definition of “spouse.” Individuals will continue to face the increased burden of proving equitable claims…

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What’s Next: Recommendations from the Kim Rogers Inquest

December 2002 was a most significant month for women’s equality seeking organizations. The Supreme Court of Canada released three important decisions (Gosselin, Walsh, and Chamberlain, the federal government tabled Bill C-22 in the House of Commons, proposing major changes to the Divorce Act in the area of custody and access, and NAWL submitted an extensive…

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Surrey Book Banning Case

“Tolerance is always age-appropriate,” Supreme Court rules. Egale Canada delighted at victory for diverse families in the classroom Egale Canada reacted with delight at the release of the Supreme Court decision in the Surrey Book Banning case. By a 7-2 majority, Canada’s highest court unequivocally rejected the Surrey School Board’s attempt to ban from the…

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Majority Embraces Stereotype of Poor

There are good news elements in the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision in Gosselin v. Québec (Attorney General). Justice Arbour has written an important and fresh decision on section 7, finding that it creates a positive obligation on governments to deal with economic deprivation. In addition, the majority on the discrimination issue is a slim…

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