Living with a partner: know your rights and responsibilities / Vivre avec une conjointe ou un conjoi

Living with a partner: know your rights and responsibilities
Vivre avec une conjointe ou un conjoint : droits et responsabilités
Listen to this as a podcast
Many laws in Ontario about families and money are different for people who are married and for people who are not married. To know your rights you need to know what it means to be legally married, and how different laws define what spouses are.
Know how the law define…
Écoutez en baladodiffusion
Plusieurs lois ontariennes régissent les familles et l’argent différemment selon que les personnes sont mariées ou qu’elles vivent en union de fait. Pour connaître ses droits, il faut savoir ce que signifie le mariage au sens de la loi et comment les différentes l…

A woman's guide to money, relationships and the law in Ontario

Listen to this as a podcast

Many laws in Ontario about families and money are different for people who are married and for people who are not married. To know your rights you need to know what it means to be legally married, and how different laws define what spouses are.

Know how the law defines marriage and unmarried spouse

Here is what being married means in Ontario:

  • Two people of the same or opposite sex have had a legal marriage ceremony performed by a judge, a justice of the peace or a licensed member of the clergy.
  • For a marriage to be legal, both people must be at least 18 years old. However, people can get married when they are 16 if they have written permission from their parents or legal guardians.
  • More than two people can be married, but only if the marriage took place in a country where polygamy is legal.
  • To end a marriage, spouses must get a legal divorce or annulment.
  • Certain classes of people who are related through blood or adoption cannot marry each other. For example, you can’t marry your sibling or half-sibling.
  • People can’t be forced to get married. Marriage must be voluntary.

Unmarried couples of the same or opposite sex are called spouses, common law partners or conjugal partners. Here is how to tell if people who live together are considered legal spouses:

  • Two people who live together as a couple can be spouses if they depend on each other financially and emotionally.
  • People must live together for some time before they become legal spouses. Some laws say people become legal spouses after only 3 months. Other laws say they are not spouses until they have lived together for 3 years.
  • The law says that two people who are in a steady relationship and have a child together are legal spouses.
  • A relationship with a spouse ends when the couple separates and will not be getting back together.
  • Two people can be spouses even if one or both of them are still legally married to someone else.

When does the law consider someone your legal spouse?

Different kinds of laws in Ontario recognize common-law relationships in different ways. Most laws define couples according to how long people have lived together. Some laws consider people spouses after only 3 months, and other laws require people to live together as a couple for at least 3 years before they are considered spouses. Some laws even say that people who have never lived together have spousal responsibilities.

You need to know what the different laws say about your relationship so that you can protect your own interests. This chart shows basic information about how different kinds of laws define a spouse.

What Law How long do you have to live together to be spouses? When can someone be your spouse even if you don’t live together? Other things about your relationship that the law considers
Social Assistance 3 months
  • If they have legal obligation to support your child
  • If there are problems in the relationship but you might reconcile
  • If they are is waiting to immigrate to Canada
  • No sexual/romantic relationship is required for someone to be your spouse
  • Your spouse could be legally married to or separated from someone else
  • Spousal status ends when you live apart with no reasonable chance of getting back together
Income Tax
  • 12 continuous months
  • 12 months is interrupted during any period of living separately for more than 90 days due to relationship breakdown
  • When they are the parent of your child by birth or adoption
  • When they have custody of your child and the child depends on them financially
  • Relationship must be conjugal
  • When filling out your tax return you should include your marital status as of December 31st
  • Spousal relationship ends on the first of 90 consecutive days of living apart due to relationship breakdown
Spousal Support 3 years If you share custody of a child and live together with “some permanence”
  • You don’t have to live together all the time
  • Other factors like how much you depend on each other may be considered
Property Division 3 years If you share a child and live together with “some permanence” Property division between spouses that aren’t married is not automatic
Child Support You don’t have to live together for child support N/A You don’t have to have a spousal relationship to have rights or responsibilities to child support
Immigration Sponsorship One year

If you can’t live together in another country for fear of persecution or punishment

  • Spouse must be at least 16 years old
  • You have to prove that you didn’t enter into the relationship for immigration purposes
Canada Pension Plan One year N/A Relationship must be conjugal

Be aware of how OW and ODSP define a spouse

Rules for both Ontario Works (OW) and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) say that the assistance amounts are different for single people and for people who live with a spouse. Couples receive less assistance together than the total amount you would get as two single people. The rules for OW and ODSP are the same for married couples as for couples that aren’t married.

If you receive benefits as a single person and OW or ODSP think that you’re living with someone as your spouse, your benefits could be cut off. If OW or ODSP says you are living with your spouse you can then apply as a couple.

If you’re receiving benefits as a single person, you must tell OW or ODSP if someone moves in with you. If you’re living with someone and that person leaves, tell OW or ODSP because you may be eligible for different benefits.

OW and ODSP use a very broad definition of spouse. Their rules say that after you live with another person for 3 months, that person is your spouse if you rely on each other financially or if you share responsibility for supporting a child. Even if you are not in a sexual or romantic relationship, OW and ODSP can say that you are spouses.

What questions can OW and ODSP ask to decide if someone is a spouse?

OW and ODSP can ask you for information about someone or about your relationship with that person in order to decide if that person is your spouse. They can ask you for information to decide whether you are financially dependant and living as a couple. OW and ODSP can ask you questions such as:

Danielle and Jacques

Danielle receives Ontario Works support. She has lived alone in a one bedroom apartment until very recently when her boyfriend Jacques moved in with her for the summer. Danielle and Jacques do not share finances and she doesn’t consider Jacques to be her spouse. However, Danielle isn’t sure if Ontario Works would say that Jacques is her spouse and if this would affect her benefits. If Danielle doesn’t call Ontario Works to say that Jacques is living with her, she could risk having her monthly support cut if Ontario Works finds out.

  • What is the social insurance number of the person you live with?
  • Where does the person you live with work, and who is their boss?
  • Do you own things together?
  • Do you pay bills together?
  • Are both of your names on leases or bills?
  • Do friends and family think you’re a couple?
  • Do your children think you’re a couple?
  • Does the person you’re living with act as a parent to your children?

OW and ODSP are not allowed to ask you about whether you are in a sexual relationship.

If you don’t answer OW or ODSP’s questions or you don’t provide them with the information they ask for, your benefits can be cut off. If OW or ODSP decides that someone is not your spouse, they can ask you about your relationship every few months to see if it has changed.

Even if you do not live with a person, OW or ODSP may consider them to be your spouse if you are apart because one of you is away at school, is working, or is waiting to immigrate to Canada. OW and ODSP can also decide you are still spouses if you are living apart and they believe there is a chance you will get back together. OW and ODSP rules say that two people are no longer spouses if they stop living together and there is no reasonable chance that they will get back together. Tell OW or ODSP as soon as your relationship changes.

Does the law require you to get child or spousal support before OW or ODSP?

Before you can get assistance from either OW or ODSP, you must first try to get financial support from a spouse, former spouse, or another parent of your children. If OW or ODSP does not believe that you are trying hard enough to get financial support from these people, they may reduce your benefits or decide that you do not qualify.

You may not have to ask for support from a spouse or parent of your child if:

  • Your spouse has abused you or your children
  • You can’t find your spouse
  • Your spouse can’t pay any support
  • Your spouse lives in a country where a support order can’t legally be enforced

If OW or ODSP decides that you don’t need to ask for support, they can ask you again after three months. They can make you prove that there are reasons you can’t ask for support from a spouse or other parent every few months.

If you receive child support or support from a former spouse, it is likely that OW or ODSP will cut the amount of your monthly benefits. Even if the payor doesn’t pay, your benefit will be reduced by the amount of support you should be getting. If your former spouse regularly misses support payments, ask to have the child support paid to OW or ODSP. That way OW and ODSP will know when your former spouse doesn’t pay and they can give you the full benefit if child support or spousal support is not paid.

How to challenge decisions from OW or ODSP

If OW or ODSP refuses your application, reduces your benefits or cuts you off because they consider you to be living with a spouse, you have 40 days to write to the office that made the decision and request an internal review. If you don’t agree with the decision of the internal review you can appeal to the Social Benefits Tribunal. For more information visit their website at www.sbt.gov.on.ca or call toll free at 1-800-753-3895 or TTY: 1-800-268-709.

Rights and responsibilities for income tax

Many calculations and tax credits are based on combining a couple’s income. This can be an advantage or a disadvantage, depending on your income and your spouse’s income

Sam and Mohamed

In 2009, Sam earned an annual income of $20,000. When she filed her taxes as a single person she received around $380 in GST and HST credits. The next year Mohamed moved in with Sam and they indicated that they were living in a common law relationship when they filed their taxes in 2010. Sam earned $23,000 and Mohamed earned $17,000 and as result Sam received around $125 in GST and HST.

Two people who both have low incomes usually pay more tax as a couple than if they were two single people. Couples where one person earns a lot more than the other person often pay less tax than couples that both earn a low income.

How does Canadian tax law define a couple?

You can file your taxes as a couple if you’re legally married or if you live in a common-law relationship. For tax purposes someone is your common-law partner if:

  • You lived with them in a relationship for 12 months in a row, even if you were apart for up to 90 days
  • They are a parent of your child, either by birth or adoption
  • They have custody of your child and your child depends on them for support

When does it help to be married or living common-law?

If one spouse has a higher income they can use the tax credits that the other spouse with a lower income does not need. Here is a list of tax credits that can be transferred from one spouse to another:

  • An Age Credit for people older than 65
  • A Child Tax Credit for children under the age of 18
  • Pension income payments
  • A Disability Tax Credit
  • Credits for the cost of post-secondary education

When is it a disadvantage to be married or living common-law?

Being part of a couple can be a disadvantage if both spouses have low incomes. Low-income couples qualify for fewer tax credits than they each would get if they were single.

The Government of Canada can help you estimate what your Child Tax Credit or your HST/GST benefit will be.

How to estimate your Child Tax Credit or your HST/GST benefit

To estimate your Child Tax Credit call 1-800-387-1193, or visit the government site.

To estimate your HST/ GST benefit call 1-800-959-1953 or visit the government site.

Rights and responsibilities when sponsoring family members to immigrate to Canada

Canadian citizens or permanent residents who are 18 years of age or older can sponsor some family members to immigrate to Canada. To sponsor family members, you must live in Canada or plan to live in Canada. Here is a list of the family members you can sponsor:

  • Married spouses
  • Common-law partners living together for at least 1 year
  • Partners of at least 1 year who can’t live together because of the law of the country they are coming from
  • Parents and grandparents
  • Dependant children (single and under the age of 22, over the age of 22 and enrolled as a full-time student, or dependant on a parent because of a physical or mental condition)
  • The dependant children of your spouse or parent
  • Children you plan to adopt
  • Orphaned relatives who are unmarried and under the age of 18

*Note that in November 2011 the Government of Canada said it will not accept any new applications to sponsor parents and grandparents for two years.

Sponsors are financially responsible for their family members

To sponsor family members, you must promise the Government of Canada that you will support your family financially. You must sign a paper saying that you will pay for everything that your family member needs. This means you must promise to pay for their food, clothes and a place to live, and also for any medical costs not covered by OHIP.

If you are on ODSP you can sponsor family members, but if you’re on any other social assistance you can’t be a sponsor. You must show that you have enough money to support the family members you want to sponsor, such as parents or grandparents, the dependant children of your spouse or parent, or any orphaned relatives.

When you sponsor a family member, you’re responsible for them for a set amount of time after they arrive in Canada. The chart below shows how long you must support your relatives after they become permanent residents:

How long sponsors are financially responsible for family members

Family member How long sponsor is responsible
Spouse At least 3 years
Children over the age of 22 At least 3 years
Other family members 10 years

If a family member that you have sponsored receives social assistance within the time period indicated above, you may be asked to pay that money back to the government. Until you pay back the amount of social assistance owed, the government may not let you sponsor any other family members.

For more information about your rights and responsibilities, see Where to get help when you need it.

If your relationship with your sponsor spouse ends

If your spouse sponsors you to come to Canada they must support you for at least 3 years, even if the relationship ends. If your marriage ends before your application for permanent residency is accepted, you can apply to stay in Canada by making an application for reasons known as Humanitarian and Compassionate Grounds. However, it can be quite difficult to successfully immigrate to Canada when you apply on Humanitarian and Compassionate Grounds.

If your marriage ends and your spouse refuses to support you, you can apply for social assistance. You can’t lose your permanent resident or landed immigrant status because your marriage ends, and you can’t lose your permanent residence or landed immigrant status because you apply for Ontario Works (OW).

If you leave your spouse because your spouse is abusive to you, talk to a lawyer. You may be able to apply to stay in Canada.

Like Canadian citizens, sponsored spouses, immigrants, refugees, and people without immigration status have financial rights when they are separating from a spouse. They have the same rights to dividing property, to the matrimonial home, and to spousal support and child support.

Écoutez en baladodiffusion

Plusieurs lois ontariennes régissent les familles et l’argent différemment selon que les personnes sont mariées ou qu’elles vivent en union de fait. Pour connaître ses droits, il faut savoir ce que signifie le mariage au sens de la loi et comment les différentes lois définissent ce qu’est une conjointe ou un conjoint.

Comment la loi définit le mariage et les conjointes et conjoints de fait

Voici ce que signifie le mariage en Ontario :

  • Deux personnes de même sexe ou de sexe opposé qui se sont unies légalement lors d’une cérémonie présidée par une juge ou un juge, une juge de paix ou un juge de paix ou un membre du clergé autorisé à célébrer des mariages.
  • Pour qu’un mariage soit légal, les deux personnes doivent avoir au moins 18 ans. Toutefois, une personne peut se marier à 16 ans avec la permission écrite de ses parents ou de ses tutrices ou tuteurs légaux.
  • Plus de deux personnes peuvent être mariées, mais seulement si le mariage a eu lieu dans un pays où la polygamie est légale.
  • Pour mettre fin au mariage, les conjointes ou conjoints doivent obtenir un divorce légal ou une annulation du mariage.
  • Certaines personnes qui sont liées par le sang ou l’adoption ne peuvent pas se marier entre elles. Vous ne pouvez pas, par exemple, épouser votre sœur ou votre frère, mais vous pouvez épouser votre cousine ou votre cousin.
  • Certaines personnes peuvent être forcées à se marier. Le mariage doit être fait avec le consentement des deux personnes.
  • Les couples non mariés, de même sexe ou de sexe opposé, sont désignés comme des conjointes ou conjoints, des conjointes ou conjoints de fait ou des partenaires conjugaux. Voici ce qui fait de deux personnes qui vivent ensemble des conjointes ou conjoints légaux :
  • Deux personnes qui vivent ensemble en tant que couple sont considérées comme des conjointes ou conjoints si elles dépendent l’une de l’autre sur le plan financier et sur le plan émotif.
  • Le couple doit avoir vécu ensemble pendant un certain temps pour être considéré comme des conjointes ou conjoints légaux. Certaines lois stipulent que l’on devient légalement conjointes ou conjoints après seulement trois mois et d’autres que cela prend trois ans.
  • La loi stipule que deux personnes qui ont une relation stable et qui ont une ou un enfant ensemble, sont considérés légalement comme des conjointes ou conjoints.
  • La relation avec une conjointe ou un conjoint se termine quand le couple se sépare sans espoir de revenir ensemble.
  • Deux personnes peuvent être considérées comme des conjointes ou conjoints ou conjoints même si l’une de ces deux personnes est encore mariée à quelqu’un d’autre.

Quand la loi considère-t-elle qu’une personne est légalement votre conjointe ou votre conjoint ?

Différentes lois ontariennes reconnaissent les unions de fait de diverses manières. La plupart des lois définissent les couples selon la durée de la vie commune. Certaines lois considèrent les deux personnes comme des conjointes ou conjoints après seulement trois mois de vie commune et d’autres stipulent qu’elles ou ils doivent avoir vécu ensemble pendant au moins trois ans. Dans certaines lois, des personnes qui n’ont jamais vécu ensemble ont quand même des responsabilités conjugales.

Pour protéger vos intérêts vous devez savoir quelles sont les dispositions des différentes lois au sujet de votre relation. Le tableau suivant donne des renseignements de base sur la façon dont les différentes lois définissent ce qu’est une conjointe ou un conjoint

Quelle loi Durée de la vie commune pour être considéré comme une conjointe ou un conjoint Quand est-on considéré comme une conjointe ou un conjoint sans faire vie commune ? Autres aspects de la relation que la loi prend en considération
Aide sociale 3 mois
  • Si une personne a l’obligation légale de payer une pension alimentaire pour votre enfant
  • S’il y a des problèmes dans la relation, mais que la réconciliation est possible
  • Si elle ou il est en attente d’immigration au Canada
  • Pour être considéré comme une conjointe ou un conjoint, il n’est pas nécessaire qu’il y ait de relation romantique ou sexuelle
  • Votre conjointe ou conjoint peut être légalement marié ou séparé d’une autre personne
  • Le statut de conjointe ou de conjoint n’existe plus quand vous ne vivez plus ensemble sans espoir de réconciliation
Impôt sur le revenu

12 mois continus

Comprend toute période de séparation de moins de 90 jours en raison d’une rupture de la relation

  • Quand il s’agit d’un parent biologique ou adoptif de votre enfant
  • Quand cette personne a la garde de votre enfant et que l’enfant dépend d’elle sur le plan financier
  • La relation doit être conjugale
  • En faisant votre déclaration de revenu, vous devez indiquer votre situation de famille au 31 décembre
  • La relation de couple prend fin le dernier jour d’une séparation de 90 jours consécutifs en raison d’une rupture
Pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint 3 ans Si vous avez la garde conjointe d’un enfant et que vous vivez ensemble de façon plus ou moins permanente
  • Vous n’avez pas à vivre ensemble tout le temps
  • D’autres facteurs comme le niveau de dépendance l’un envers l’autre ou les sommes que vous dépensez peuvent être pris en considération
Partage des biens 3 ans Si vous avez un enfant en commun et que vous vivez ensemble de façon plus ou moins permanente Le partage des biens entre personnes qui ne sont pas mariées n’est pas automatique
Pension alimentaire pour enfants Il n’est pas nécessaire de vivre ensemble s.o. Vous n’avez pas à avoir une relation conjugale pour avoir des droits et des responsabilités en matière de pension alimentaire pour enfants
Parrainage aux fins de l’immigration 1 an Si vous ne pouvez pas vivre ensemble dans un autre pays sans crainte de persécution ou de sanctions
  • Les conjointes ou conjoints doivent avoir au moins 16 ans
  • Vous devez prouver que cette relation n’avait pas pour but des questions d’immigration
Régime de pensions du Canada 1 an s.o. La relation doit être conjugale

Comment Ontario au travail (OT) et le Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées (POSPH) définissent une conjointe ou un conjoint

Les règles d’Ontario au travail et du Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées stipulent que les montants d’aide varient pour les personnes célibataires et pour celles qui ont une conjointe ou un conjoint. Les couples reçoivent moins d’argent ensemble que s’ils vivaient chacun de leur côté en célibataires. Les règles d’Ot et du POSPH sont les mêmes pour les personnes mariées et pour les celles qui ne le sont pas.

Si vous recevez des prestations comme célibataire et qu’OT ou le POSPH pense que vous vivez avec une autre personne qui serait votre conjointe ou votre conjoint, vos prestations pourraient être coupées. Si un des deux organismes déclare que vous vivez avec une conjointe ou un conjoint, vous pourrez faire une demande de prestations en tant que couple.

Danielle et Jacques

Danielle reçoit des prestations d’Ontario au travail (OT). Elle a vécu seule dans un appartement d’une chambre à coucher jusqu’à tout récemment alors que son copain, Jacques, a emménagé avec elle pour l’été. Danielle et Jacques ne partagent pas leurs finances et elle ne le considère pas comme son conjoint. Danielle n’est toutefois pas certaine qu’Ontario au travail ne considérera pas Jacques comme son conjoint, ce qui pourrait avoir des conséquences sur ses prestations. Si Danielle n’avertit pas OT que Jacques demeure avec elle et que la chose est découverte, elle risque que ses prestations soient coupées.

Si vous recevez des prestations en tant que célibataire, vous devez aviser OT ou le POSPH qu’une autre personne déménage avec vous. Si vous vivez avec quelqu’un et que cette personne s’en va, il serait bon de les avertir parce que vous pourriez avoir droit à des prestations plus élevées.

Ontario au travail et le Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées définissent très largement ce qu’est une conjointe ou un conjoint. D’après leurs règles, si vous demeurez avec une autre personne pendant trois mois, cette personne est votre conjointe ou votre conjoint si vous comptez l’une sur l’autre sur le plan financier ou si vous partagez la responsabilité de prendre soin d’une ou d’un enfant. Même s’il ne s’agit pas d’une relation romantique ou sexuelle, ils peuvent vous considérer comme une conjointe.

Quelles questions peuvent poser Ontario au travail (OT) et le Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées (POSPH) pour décider qu’une personne est une conjointe ou un conjoint ?

Ontario au travail et le Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées peuvent poser des questions sur une personne ou sur votre relation avec cette personne afin de décider si cette personne est votre conjointe ou votre conjoint. Ils peuvent vous demander des renseignements pour vérifier si vous dépendez de l’autre personne financièrement et si vous vivez en tant couple. OT et le POSPH peuvent vous poser des questions comme :

  • Quelle est le numéro d’assurance sociale de la personne qui habite avec vous ?
  • Où travaille la personne qui habite avec vous et qui est sa patronne ou son patron ?
  • Est-ce que vous possédez des choses en commun ?
  • Payez-vous des comptes ensemble ?
  • Est-ce que vos deux noms figurent sur le bail ou sur les factures ?
  • Est-ce que vos amies et amis et votre famille pensent que vous formez un couple ?
  • Vos enfants pensent-ils que vous formez un couple ?
  • Est-ce que la personne qui habite avec vous agit comme un parent envers vos enfants ?
  • Ils n’ont toutefois pas le droit de vous demander si vous avez une relation physique ou sexuelle.

Si vous refusez de répondre aux questions d’OT ou du POSPH ou de leur fournir les renseignements qu’ils demandent, vos prestations pourraient être coupées. S’ils décident que cette personne n’est pas votre conjointe ou votre conjoint, ils pourraient vous poser à nouveau des questions tous les deux ou trois mois au sujet de votre relation pour vérifier si rien n’a changé.

Même si vous ne vivez pas avec quelqu’un, OT ou le POSPH pourraient considérer une personne comme votre conjointe ou conjoint si vous vivez séparément parce que l’un de vous est aux études, travaille à l’extérieur ou est en attente d’immigration au Canada. Ils peuvent aussi décider que vous êtes encore des conjointes ou conjoints si vous vivez séparément et que, d’après eux, il y a des chances de réconciliation. Leurs règles stipulent que deux personnes ne sont plus considérées comme des conjointes ou conjoints si elles ne vivent plus ensemble et qu’il n’y a plus de chance raisonnable qu’elles se réconcilient. Avertissez OT ou le POSPH dès qu’il y a des changements dans votre relation

La loi exige-t-elle que vous obteniez une pension alimentaire pour enfants ou une pension alimentaire pour conjointe avant d’avoir droit à des prestations d’Ontario au travail (OT) ou du Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées (POSPH) ?

Avant de pouvoir obtenir de l’aide d’OT ou du POSPH, vous devez d’abord tenter d’obtenir du soutien financier de votre ex-conjointe ou ex-conjoint. Si, d’après eux, vos efforts ne sont pas suffisants, ils pourraient réduire vos prestations ou décider que vous n’êtes pas admissible.

Vous pourriez ne pas avoir à demander d’aide financière à une conjointe ou à un conjoint ou au parent de votre enfant si :

  • votre conjointe ou conjoint a fait preuve de violence envers vous ou envers vos enfants
  • vous ne pouvez pas retrouver votre ex-conjointe ou ex-conjoint
  • votre ex-conjointe ou ex-conjoint n’a pas les moyens de payer une pension alimentaire
  • votre ex-conjointe ou ex-conjoint demeure dans un pays où il est impossible de faire appliquer une ordonnance de pension alimentaire

Si OT ou le POSPH décide que vous n’avez pas à demander une pension alimentaire, ils vous reposeront les mêmes questions trois mois plus tard. Ils peuvent exiger des preuves des raisons pour lesquelles vous ne pouvez pas demander une pension alimentaire à votre ex-conjointe ou ex-conjoint ou à un autre parent tous les trois mois.

Si vous recevez une pension alimentaire pour enfants ou une pension alimentaire pour conjointe d’une ex-conjointe ou ex-conjoint, OT ou le POSPH réduira sans doute vos prestations mensuelles en conséquence. Même si le payeur ne paie pas, on soustraira le montant de la pension alimentaire que vous devriez recevoir de vos prestations. S’il arrive souvent que votre ex-conjointe ou votre ex-conjoint ne paie pas la pension alimentaire pour enfants, demandez qu’elle soit payée directement à OT ou au POSPH. Ainsi, ils sauront quand la pension alimentaire n’est pas payée et pourront vous accorder le plein montant des prestations auxquelles vous avez droit.

Contester les décisions d’Ontario au travail (OT) et du Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées (POSPH)

Si OT ou le POSPH refuse votre demande, réduit vos prestations ou coupe vos prestations parce qu’il considère que vous vivez avec une conjointe ou un conjoint, vous avez 40 jours pour demander par écrit une révision interne au bureau qui a pris la décision. Si vous n’êtes pas d’accord avec le résultat de la révision interne, vous pouvez faire appel au Tribunal de l’aide sociale. Pour de plus amples renseignements, visitez leur site Web au www.sbt.gov.on.ca, Vous pouvez aussi appeler sans frais au 1-800-753-3895 ou ATS : 1-800-268-709.

Les droits et les responsabilités en matière d’impôt

Plusieurs calculs et crédits d’impôts sont basés sur le revenu combiné du couple. Cela peut être avantageux ou désavantageux dépendamment de votre revenu et de celui de votre conjointe ou conjoint.

Sam et Mohamed

En 2009, Sam a gagné 20 000 $. Quand elle a fait sa déclaration de revenu en tant que célibataire, elle a reçu environ 380 $ en crédits de TPS et de TVH. L’année suivante, Mohamed a emménagé avec elle et, dans leurs déclarations de revenu de 2010, ils ont indiqué qu’ils vivaient en union de fait. Sam avait gagné 23 000 $ et Mohamed 17 000 $. Résultat : Sam a reçu environ 125 $ en crédits de TPS et de TVH.

Deux personnes qui ont toutes les deux de faibles revenus paient habituellement plus d’impôt en tant que couple que s’ils étaient célibataires. Les couples où une personne du couple gagne beaucoup plus d’argent que l’autre paient généralement moins d’impôt que les couples où les deux personnes ont de faibles revenus.

Comment la loi canadienne sur l’impôt définit le couple

Dans votre déclaration de revenu, vous pouvez indiquer que vous êtes mariée ou que vous vivez en union de fait. Aux fins de l’impôt, une personne est une conjointe ou un conjoint de fait si :

  • le couple a vécu ensemble pendant 12 mois d’affilée, même si vous avez été séparés pendant une période allant jusqu’à 90 jours
  • le couple a une ou un enfant, biologique ou adoptif
  • le couple a la garde de l’enfant et cet enfant dépend de leur soutien financier

Quand est-ce avantageux de vivre en couple ?

Si une conjointe ou un conjoint a un revenu plus élevé que l’autre, elle ou il peut utiliser les crédits d’impôt que l’autre personne n’a pas utilisés.

Voici une liste des crédits d’impôt qui peuvent être transférés d’un conjoint à l’autre :

  • Un crédit en raison de l’âge pour les personnes de 65 ans et plus
  • Un crédit d’impôt pour enfant pour les enfants de moins de 18 ans
  • Des paiements d’un régime de retraite
  • Un crédit d’impôt pour personne handicapée
  • Des crédits pour des frais d’études postsecondaires

Quand est-ce désavantageux de vivre en couple ?

Vivre en couple peut être désavantageux si les deux personnes ont de faibles revenus. Les couples à faible revenu sont admissibles à moins de crédits d’Impôt que ceux auxquels ils auraient droit s’ils étaient tous les deux célibataires.

Le gouvernement du Canada peut vous aider à estimer quel sera le montant de votre crédit d’impôt pour enfant ou de vos remboursements de TVH ou de TPS

Comment estimer votre crédit d’impôt pour enfant ou votre remboursement de TVH ou de TPS

Pour estimer votre crédit d’impôt pour enfant, appelez au 1-800-387-119 ou consultez le site Web du gouvernement.

Pour estimer votre remboursement de TVH ou de TPS, appelez le 1-800-959-1953 ou consultez le site Web du gouvernement.

Les droits et les responsabilités liés au parrainage de membres de la famille qui veulent immigrer au Canada

Les citoyennes et citoyens canadiens ou les résidentes et résidents permanents âgés de 18 ans et plus peuvent parrainer certains membres de leur famille qui veulent immigrer au Canada. Pour parrainer des membres de la famille, vous devez résider au Canada ou prévoir que vous y résiderez. Voici la liste des membres de la famille qui peuvent être parrainés :

  • Les conjointes et conjoints mariés
  • Les conjointes et conjoints de fait qui vivent ensemble depuis au moins un an
  • Les partenaires intimes dont la relation dure depuis au moins un an, mais qui ne peuvent pas vivre ensemble en raison des lois de leur pays d’origine.
  • Les parents et les grands-parents
  • Les enfants à charge (célibataires ou âgés de moins de 22 ans, âgés de plus de 22 ans mais aux études à plein temps ou les enfants à charge de leurs parents en raison de limitations fonctionnelles physiques ou mentales)
  • Les enfants à charge de votre conjointe ou conjoint ou du parent
  • Les enfants que vous prévoyez adopter
  • Les parents orphelins qui ne sont pas mariés et qui sont âgés de moins de 18 ans

* Signalons qu’en novembre 2011 le gouvernement du Canada a indiqué que, pour une période de deux ans, il n’accepterait pas de nouvelles demandes de parrainage pour les parents et les grands-parents.

Pour parrainer des membres de la famille, vous devez promettre au gouvernement du Canada que vous les soutiendrez financièrement. Vous devez signer un document indiquant que vous paierez pour tous les besoins de votre famille. Cela signifie que vous devez promettre de payer pour la nourriture, les vêtements, le logement, mais également pour tous les frais médicaux qui ne sont pas couverts par l’Assurance-santé de l’Ontario.

Si vous recevez des prestations du Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées, vous pouvez parrainer des membres de votre famille, ce qui n’est pas le cas pour tous les autres programmes d’aide sociale. Vous devez démontrer que vous avez suffisamment d’argent pour soutenir financièrement les membres de la famille que vous voulez parrainer, comme vos parents ou vos grands-parents, des enfants à charge de votre conjointe ou conjoint ou de vos parents ou tout autre parent orphelin.

Quand vous parrainez un membre de la famille, après son arrivée au Canada, vous êtes responsable pour une période de temps établie. Le tableau suivant montre combien de temps vous devez soutenir financièrement les membres de votre famille qui deviennent des résidentes ou des résidents permanents.

Pendant combien de temps les répondantes et les répondants sont-ils responsables financièrement pour les membres de la famille

Membre de la famille Durée du parrainage
Conjointe ou conjoint Au moins 3 ans
Enfants âgés de plus de 22 ans Au moins 3 ans
Autres membres de la famille 10 ans

Si un membre de la famille que vous avez parrainé reçoit de l’aide sociale au cours de la période mentionnée ci-dessus, on pourrait vous demander de rembourser l’argent au gouvernement. Le gouvernement pourrait vous interdire de parrainer un autre membre de votre famille avant que toutes les sommes n’aient été remboursées.

Pour de plus amples renseignements au sujet de vos droits et de vos responsabilités, voir Où trouver l’aide dont vous avez besoin.

Si la relation avec votre répondante ou votre répondant prend fin

Si votre conjointe ou conjoint vous parraine pour venir au Canada, elle ou il doit vous soutenir financièrement pendant au moins trois ans, même si votre relation prend fin. Si votre mariage prend fin avant que votre demande de résidence permanente soit acceptée, vous pouvez faire une demande pour rester au Canada en invoquant des raisons d’ordre humanitaire. Il peut toutefois être très difficile d’immigrer au Canada pour des raisons d’ordre humanitaire.

Si votre mariage prend fin et que votre conjointe ou conjoint refuse de vous soutenir financièrement, vous pouvez faire une demande d’aide sociale. Vous pouvez perdre votre résidence permanente ou votre statut d’immigrante reçue si votre mariage prend fin, mais aussi si vous faites une demande à Ontario au travail.

Si vous quittez votre conjointe ou conjoint pour des raisons de violence, consultez une avocate ou un avocat. Elle ou il pourrait faire une requête pour que vous puissiez demeurer au Canada.

Comme les citoyennes et les citoyens canadiens, les conjointes et conjoints parrainés, les immigrantes et les immigrants, les personnes réfugiées et les personnes qui n’ont pas de statut d’immigration ont des droits financiers lorsqu’elles ou ils se séparent d’une conjointe ou d’un conjoint. Elles et ils ont droit au partage des biens, au foyer conjugal et à une pension alimentaire pour enfants ou pour conjointe ou conjoint.