When a relationship ends: know your rights and responsibilities / Vos droits et vos responsabilités

When a relationship ends: know your rights and responsibilities
Vos droits et vos responsabilités quand la relation prend fin
Listen to this as a podcast
When a couple separates, how their property gets divided is different for married couples than it is for unmarried spouses. Couples that are married have to equally divide the value of all of what they own and what they owe, but unmarried spouses do not. The most impor…
Écoutez en baladodiffusion
Quand un couple se sépare, la façon de partager les biens diffère si le couple est marié ou s’il vivait en union de fait. Les couples mariés doivent séparer également la valeur de tous leurs biens et de toutes leurs dettes, mais ce n’est pas le cas pour les coup…

A woman's guide to money, relationships and the law in Ontario

Listen to this as a podcast

When a couple separates, how their property gets divided is different for married couples than it is for unmarried spouses. Couples that are married have to equally divide the value of all of what they own and what they owe, but unmarried spouses do not. The most important differences between married and unmarried spouses concern how the law deals with the home where you live, your property, and your debts.

The following table summarizes the differences between financial rights when a marriage ends and when unmarried spouses split up.

  Unmarried Spouses Married Spouses

Division of Property

Property includes: Money, assets, pensions, interests in a property and disability benefits

  • There is no automatic right to a division of property, but a spouse may have a claim to make if their actions have significantly contributed to the other spouse’s wealth
  • There is a 2-year time-limit after separation to make a claim in court The value of property obtained during the marriage is divided equally
  • The spouse with the higher valued property pays half of the difference of both property values to the other spouse
  • There is a 6-year time limit after separation, and a 2-year limit after divorce to make a claim in court
Matrimonial Home

Any house that the couple lived in together at the time of their separation

  • Home remains the property of the person whose name is on the deed
  • Unmarried spouses are not automatically entitled to the division of the matrimonial home
  • The value of the home is divided equally regardless of whose name is on the deed
  • Both spouses have the right to live in the home
Debts and Loans
  • Each spouse is responsible for paying the debts that are in their name
  • Only joint debts in both names are shared
  • Each spouse is responsible for paying the debts that are in their name
  • Only debts in both names are shared
Canada Pension Plan (CPP) Benefits
  • Pension credits that each person earned while living together are divided equally
  • 4-year time limit to apply for a division of pension credit after separating
  • Pension credits that each person earned while married are divided equally
  • There is no time limit to apply for a division of pension credits
Child Support
  • Each parent must support children under 18, or children over 18 who are unable to withdraw from parental custody because of a disability
  • Parents may also be required to support children who are over 18 and enrolled in a full-time education program
  • Each parent must support children under 18, or children over 18 who are unable to withdraw from parental custody because of a disability
  • Parents may also be required to support children who are over 18 and enrolled in a full-time education program
Spousal Support
  • After separation, spouses have an obligation to support each other depending on need and the extent of their ability
  • 2-year time limit from the date of separation to apply for spousal support
  • After separation, spouses have an obligation to support each other depending on need and the extent of their ability
  • No time limit to apply for spousal support.

Rights to the home where you live

A matrimonial home is any property that a couple lives in and that both spouses are using when they separate. A matrimonial home is a home someone owns. Laws dealing with the matrimonial home don’t apply to homes that a couple rents. What happens to the matrimonial home depends on whether the couple is married or unmarried.

What married couples need to know about the matrimonial home

If the couple is married, each spouse has a right to half the value of the matrimonial home. This is true even if only one spouse’s name is on the deed, or if one spouse bought the home before the couple got married.

When a marriage ends, both spouses have equal rights to live in the matrimonial home. This means that you can’t be kicked out of your house because you’re separating

If you can’t agree about who should live in the house after you separate, you can ask the court to decide for you. When making a decision about who will live in the home, a judge can consider the following things:

  • How much money each spouse has
  • If the couple has any written agreements about the house
  • What is best for the children
  • If there are other places for the spouses to live
  • If there is a history of domestic abuse

One spouse can’t sell the matrimonial home without permission from the other spouse. One spouse can’t take out a mortgage or lease on the matrimonial home without permission from the other spouse. If they do either of these things, the court can rule that the deals were illegal.

A couple can have more than one matrimonial home if they spend a lot of time at the property as a family. For instance, a cottage may be a matrimonial home if the spouses spent a lot of time there as a family before they separated.

If a couple can’t agree on what is a matrimonial home, you can ask the court to decide.

Property stops being considered a matrimonial home when a couple gets divorced. If you own a home you should settle questions about how to divide property before you get an official divorce

What unmarried couples need to know about the matrimonial home

If the couple is not married, the matrimonial home belongs to the person whose name is on the deed. If a couple has a cohabitation agreement, it should say who can live in the home and how the value of the home will be divided. The couple must follow what the agreement says, as long as the agreement is legal.

If you are in an abusive relationship, you may be able to stay in your home even if your name is not on the deed. To do this, you must apply for a restraining order that says your abuser must stay away from the property and that you are allowed to live in the home. It is very difficult to get this type of order. If you are in this position you should talk to a lawyer.

What couples living on-reserve need to know about the matrimonial home

If you live on a First Nation reserve, Ontario laws about the matrimonial home do not apply. Instead, the law that applies is The Indian Act. The Indian Act doesn’t mention anything about how to divide property when a relationship ends. This means that married people living on reserve don’t automatically have a right to half the value of the matrimonial home.

The inherent rights to land of Indigenous peoples are not accurately reflected in the Canadian Legal system. The federal government has said it will change the laws that affect the property rights of people living on-reserve and will allow First Nations to pass their own laws about owning and dividing land and houses on their territories.

For more information about property laws on-reserve in Ontario, contact the Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto at (416) 408-3967 or at www.aboriginallegal.ca or The Ontario Native Women’s Association at 1-800-667-0816 or at www.onwa-tbay.ca

Responsibilities for debts and loans

Whether you are married or unmarried, you are responsible for the debt you accumulate in your name, or the debt that you accumulate jointly with someone in both your names.

If you’re married the amount of debt you owe is subtracted from the total amount of your property value when you’re calculating how to equally divide property at separation.

Running up large debts in a partner’s name or in joint accounts, with or without their consent, is a common form of economic abuse. See Economic abuse in relationships.

Property rights for married couples

Property includes the money, pensions and disability benefits, real estate and other assets that the couple have.

If you are married:

  • Property that you got during your marriage must be divided equally
  • If your spouse owns property that is worth more than your property, they must give you half of the difference in value between their property and yours
  • You can ask a court to make a decision about dividing the property. You must make the claim within 6 years after you separate and within 2 years after you get divorced.

The law says that married spouses must equally divide all of the property that the couple gained during marriage. It doesn’t matter who paid for what, or whose name is on the deed for the property. Remember that the matrimonial home is divided equally even if someone owned it before the couple got married. See Rights to the home where you live.

However, an exception to the rule around matrimonial homes is if a spouse owned a home before marriage that is used as a matrimonial home during marriage and it is then sold before the relationship ends. If a matrimonial home is sold before the relationship ends, the spouse who owned it can then count the value of the home on the date of marriage as property they owned before they were married, and that value does not have to be divided equally.

It’s helpful to know how to divide your property according to the law but it’s not always necessary depending on how you choose to resolve your issues at separation.

To calculate how to equally divide your property according to the law, follow this two-step formula:

Step 1: Each spouse must calculate their Net Family Property (NFP).

To find this amount, each spouse must add up the value of everything they own. From this amount they must subtract the value of what they owned before they got married, their debts and any inheritances or gifts.

Step 2: The couple must calculate the equalization payment amount.

The equalization payment is a payment that the spouse with the higher NFP must make to the spouse with the lower NFP. The amount of the equalization payment is half of the difference between the higher and lower NFP.

Download a sample calculation sheet (PDF).

When would an equalization payment be a different amount?

In special cases a court can order one spouse to pay more or less than the calculated equalization payment. This can happen if a judge believes that the equalization amount is extremely unfair, or if the couple signed a marriage contract or other agreement.

If you have a marriage contract or another agreement, the court will order you to follow what it says unless the contract is deemed to be extremely unfair. The court will not order you to follow an agreement that you were forced to sign. If you signed a contract because you were bullied, pressured or lied to, tell the court.

Here are the things a judge will consider when they decide whether an equalization payment is fair:

  • One spouse didn’t tell the other spouse about all their debts at the time of marriage
  • One spouse accumulated debt by being reckless, or by purposely acting unfairly
  • One spouse deliberately reduced their property, or spent their money, before the couple separated
  • The NFP of one spouse includes large gifts from the other spouse
  • The spouses lived together for less than 5 years and the equalization amount would give one spouse more than their fair share of the property

Property rights for unmarried couples

Property includes the money, pensions and disability benefits, real estate, and other assets that the couple owns. If you are not married:

  • You don’t automatically have a right to your spouse’s property
  • You can ask a court to order that your spouse give you some of their property, if you can show that what you did during the relationship made it possible for your spouse to get that property or your actions increased its value
  • You must make a claim in court within 2 years after you separate

When an unmarried couple separates, each spouse keeps the property they brought into the relationship and anything they bought while they were part of the couple. The only property that is divided equally is assets that list both spouses as owners.

If a couple has a cohabitation agreement, the property will be divided according to what the agreement says. Couples can also write a separation agreement about how to divide the property. See Writing a Separation Agreement.

What happens if you can’t agree?

If a couple cannot agree about how to divide property, they can go to court and ask a judge to decide. You can ask a court to help divide your property if:

  • You can’t agree about how to divide something you and your spouse bought together
  • You and your spouse planned to share property that was only in one person’s name
  • The property is in your spouse’s name, but you made it possible for them to buy it and you suffered financially because of this
  • The property is in your spouse’s name, but you helped add to the value of that property, and you suffered financially because of this

You should be able to get some of the value of property that is in your spouse’s name if you can show how work that you did helped your spouse to get richer i.e you contributed to your spouse’s business or supported them while they were in school or advancing their career.

Women’s work in the home, including caring for children, is one thing that makes it possible for many couples to get richer. The court often recognizes this work, but fighting for this in court can be a long process and can cost a lot of money.

If you think you might have a right to some of the value of your spouse’s property, talk to a lawyer. For information on how to find a lawyer see Where to get help when you need it.

Property rights for couples living on-reserve

The inherent rights to land of Indigenous peoples are not accurately reflected in the Canadian legal system. Ontario laws concerning the division of property do not apply to land or property on reserves. The Indian Act is the law that applies to land on-reserve. The Indian Act does not mention how to divide property when a relationship ends. This means that people living on First Nation reserves have no automatic rights to property and land when a relationship ends.

The federal government has said it will change the laws that affect the property rights of people living on-reserve and will allow First Nations to pass their own laws about owning and dividing land and houses on their territories. However, this promise has not been made into law.

For more information about property laws on-reserve in Ontario contact Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto at (416) 408-3967 or at www.aboriginallegal.ca or The Ontario Native Women’s Association at 1-800-667-0816 or at www.onwa-tbay.ca.

Rights to pensions

The value of a pension is considered property. For married couples, pensions must be included in the calculation of the Net Family Property (NFP). The value of the pension for NFP starts on the date that the couple got married and ends on the date of separation. A pension administrator will use these dates to calculate the value of the pension.

Spouses can decide how to divide the value of a pension in a marriage contract, a cohabitation agreement or separation agreement.

After separation, the amount of the divided pension can be paid to a spouse in regular installments or in a lump sum.

Canada Pension Plan (CPP) benefits

When a relationship ends, both married and unmarried spouses can ask to split their Canada Pension Plan (CPP) credits. The CPP credits that both individuals earned while married or in a common-law relationship are then combined and then split equally between the two people. Both married and unmarried spouses have to have lived together for at least 1 year to be eligible to split their CPP credits.

If you’re ending a common-law relationship you have to wait 1 year after separating to request that your credits be divided, and you have to make your claim within 4 years after you and your spouse separate.

If you’re married and separated you have to wait 1 year after separating to request that your credits be divided and there is no time limit after that for credits to be divided. If you’re divorced you don’t have to wait to request that your credits be divided and there is no time limit for credits to be divided.

The exchange of credits will be greater the longer a couple was together, and if one person earns a lot more than the other. If you have fewer CPP credits than your spouse, splitting them can be advantageous. If you have more CPP credits than your spouse, dividing them may not be to your advantage.

A CPP credit split application can be obtained from any Service Canada Centre at 1-800-277-9914 or TTY at 1-800-255-4786.

There is a 90-day time limit to appeal a decision about CPP credit splitting.

Couples may also be eligible to split credits from other types of pensions like pensions from private employers.

Rights and responsibilities for spousal support

Spousal support is an amount of money that one spouse pays to the other to help them become financially independent when the relationship ends. It is meant to make sure that both spouses share the financial effects of separating. Both married and unmarried spouses are responsible for paying spousal support.

The amount of support depends on what the dependent spouse needs and on what the wealthier spouse can pay. Spousal support can be one lump sum payment, or regular amounts paid over a set period of time, or an indefinite period of time. Both spouses must declare spousal support when filing their income tax. The spouse who receives support must declare it as income, and the spouse who pays support can claim it as a tax deduction.

Couples can make their own decisions about spousal support. If they do, their decision should be included in their marriage, cohabitation, or separation agreement. If the couple can’t agree on spousal support, they can apply to family court and a judge will decide for them. Unmarried couples have 2 years from the date of separation to apply to the court for a spousal support order. There is no time limit for married couples to apply to courts for a spousal support order.

How courts calculate spousal support

When a couple asks the court to decide about spousal support, the judge will review their finances. Each spouse must bring papers showing their own financial situation. This information can include personal income tax returns, a pay statement, a social assistance statement or some other proof of their income, and a list of their assets and expenses.

When a couple goes to court to determine spousal support, here is what the judge will consider:

  • How long the spouses were married or lived together
  • How much each person earns or could earn
  • Each spouse’s age and how healthy they are
  • How well one spouse could support the other’s career
  • What one spouse did to support the other’s career
  • How much time and effort each spouse put into caring for the children during the relationship
  • How each spouse’s responsibilities in the relationship affected their ability to earn an income

Usually the judge will not focus on other parts of the relationship. For example, if one spouse was abusive or unfaithful, these actions will not affect the amount of spousal support that the court orders.

Ummni and Jen

Ummni and Jen have been living together for 5 years and have been married for 2 years. Jen works part time and does most of the household work and Ummni works full time, earning almost double Jen’s income. They live in a house Ummni has owned since before they were a couple. Ummni feels that Jen is treating her badly and thinks that she has been cheating on her with someone else. Ummni decides to break up with Jen and wants Jen to move out of the house and to pay her monthly spousal support. However, because they are married the house belongs to both of them equally, and because Ummni earns more money than Jen, Ummni will likely have to pay spousal support regardless of Jen’s behaviour.

To identify a reasonable amount of support, most judges and lawyers look at the Canadian government’s Spousal Support Guidelines (SCG). These guidelines use a general formula to calculate support, and suggest for how long support should be paid for. The SCG suggest a range of amounts for judges to consider when they compare the difference between each spouse’s gross income, and how long the spouses were married or living together. The greater the difference between the spouse’s incomes and the longer a couple was married or lived together, the larger the spousal support amounts may be and the longer they must be paid. Every situation is different and judges decide spousal support by considering each specific case.

Spousal support orders can be changed after six months if either spouse’s life has changed significantly. Below is a list of circumstances where you could ask for the support to change:

  • If your income is much higher or much lower than when the order was first made
  • If your spouse’s income is much higher or much lower
  • If either spouse remarries
  • If either spouse retires
  • If either spouse develops a disability and needs more support or one can pay less support
  • If the cost of living has changed significantly since the support was ordered

Ontario laws say that child support is more important than spousal support. This means that if someone cannot afford to pay both child support and spousal support, they may only have to pay child support. After their duty to pay child support ends, they can then be ordered to pay spousal support.

Rights and responsibilities for child support

In Ontario, the laws about child support are the same for married spouses, unmarried spouses, and all parents of children whether or not the parents have ever been in a spousal relationship.

People who are not parents but who have shown over time that they intend to act like parents can also be held responsible for supporting children.

All parents must support their children until the children are 18 years old. If a child gets married or leaves the home, even if they are under 18 years old, parents are no longer responsible for supporting them. However, a judge could order a parent to support a child who is over 18 if the child is a full-time student, is sick, or has a disability.

The responsibility to support a child who is over 18 will depend on things like the relationship the child has with the payor and the financial situation of both the child and the payor.

Parents must support their children even if:

  • They don’t live with the children
  • They aren’t married to the other parent
  • They never lived with the other parent

Adults who must support children can include:

  • The biological mother or father
  • A parent who has adopted a child
  • A stepparent who has shown, over time, that they plan to act as a parent
  • Another adult who has shown over time, that they plan to act as a parent

Sophie and Martin

Sophie and Martin have been dating off and on for some time. After a few months of casual dating they have a baby. Their daughter lives with Sophie and Martin visits with her every week. Because Martin earns $45,000 a year, the Child Support Guidelines requires him to pay Sophie $406 a month.

Parents who live with, and take care of the children have the right to child support from the other parent or parents. If the kids spend about an equal amount of time living with each parent, the parent with the highest income may have to pay child support to the other parent.

The amount of child support that a parent must pay is set by the Governments of Ontario and Canada in the Child Support Guidelines. The amount a parent must pay depends on the parent’s income and how many children they must support. Here is a chart showing some of the Child Support Guideline amounts.

Examples of Child Support Guideline Amounts

Payer’s Income Amount of support to be paid every month
  1 child 2 children 3 children
$15,000 $97 $195 $210
$20,000 $160 $306 $404
$25,000 $200 $373 $511
$30,000 $245 $438 $591
$35,000 $303 $508 $685
$40,000 $360 $579 $764
$45,000 $406 $664 $858
$50,000 $450 $743 $959
$55,000 $498 $817 $1068
$60,000 $546 $892 $1168
$65,000 $594 $966 $1264

Please note: This chart shows examples of amounts set out in the Child Support Guidelines for Ontario. To calculate the child support for your situation visit the Federal Government website.

If parents cannot agree about child support—the amount, who will pay it or what the terms of child support will be—they can apply in court for a judge to make a decision about child support. See Going to court.

Sometimes the court will order a parent to pay less than the Child Support Guidelines suggests if:

  • The child is over age of 18
  • The child spends an equal amount of time living with each parent
  • Both parents have custody of at least one child
  • The payor proves that they would suffer from undue financial hardship by paying the higher amount

Guideline amounts are meant to help pay for basic living expenses only. The court may decide that a parent must pay more than the Guideline amount if there certain extra expenses to pay. These extra expenses can include things like medical insurance, childcare costs, health-care costs, and expenses related to a child’s education. Extra expenses are usually shared between parents depending on their incomes.

After child support has been paid for 6 months, either parent can ask the court to change the child support order. They can ask for a change if their income has risen or fallen, or if the cost of raising the children has gone up.

How to enforce support orders

In Ontario, a government office called the Family Responsibility Office (FRO) enforces support orders. When a court orders someone to pay spousal or child support, the order is automatically filed with the FRO. The FRO will also enforce orders for couples who separated without going to court. If the couple gives the FRO a copy of their separation agreements, the FRO will enforce orders for couples who separated without going to court. See Writing a separation agreement.

The FRO collects payments from the person who has been ordered to pay spousal support or child support. Once it collects the money, the FRO gives the support payment to the other person. For more information about the FRO visit www.ontario.ca/FRO or call 1-800-267-4330.

If the payer doesn’t pay support, the FRO can collect the money from the payor’s employer. The FRO can get money from the payor’s bank accounts or by putting a lien on something that the payor owns. If the FRO discovers that the payer is trying to avoid paying by hiding money, another person who is linked financially to the payer can be ordered to pay the support payments. This person might be a new spouse, or another family member that the payor share expenses with. The FRO can also collect support payments from money the government owes to the payer.

The FRO can collect money from a payer who does not live in Ontario. It has the power to enforce support orders across Canada, and in the United States and several other countries.

If a payer has not paid support, the FRO can suspend a payer’s driver license, their hunting or fishing license or their passport. When a payer refuses to pay support, they can be sent to jail for up to 180 days.

If someone doesn’t pay you support for years, you can ask the court to order retroactive payment of support arrears. See Going to court.

Écoutez en baladodiffusion

Quand un couple se sépare, la façon de partager les biens diffère si le couple est marié ou s’il vivait en union de fait. Les couples mariés doivent séparer également la valeur de tous leurs biens et de toutes leurs dettes, mais ce n’est pas le cas pour les couples qui ne sont pas mariés. La principale différence entre les conjointes et conjoints mariés et non mariés, ce sont les dispositions de la loi sur la maison qu’ils habitent, sur leurs biens et sur leurs dettes.

Le tableau suivant résume les différences entre les droits financiers des personnes qui étaient mariées au moment de la rupture et ceux des personnes qui vivaient en union de fait.

  Conjointes et conjoints non mariés Conjointes et conjoints mariés

Partage des biens

Les biens, ce sont l’argent, les actifs, les pensions, les intérêts dans des propriétés et les prestations d’invalidité

  • Il n’existe pas de partage automatique des biens, mais une conjointe ou un conjoint pourrait faire une requête si elle ou il a contribué considérablement au patrimoine financier de l’autre
  • Il y a un délai limite de deux ans après la séparation pour déposer une requête à la cour
  • La valeur des biens acquis au cours du mariage est séparée également
  • La conjointe ou le conjoint dont les biens ont la plus grande valeur paie à la conjointe ou au conjoint dont les biens ont une valeur moindre la moitié de la différence entre les deux
  • Il y a un délai limite de six ans après la séparation et de deux ans après le divorce pour faire une requête à la cour

Foyer conjugal

Toute maison dans laquelle vivait le couple au moment de la séparation

  • La personne dont le nom apparaît sur le titre de propriété reste propriétaire de la maison
  • Les personnes non mariées n’ont pas automatiquement droit au partage du foyer conjugal
  • La valeur de la maison est divisée également quel que soit le nom qui apparaît sur le titre de propriété
  • Les deux personnes ont le droit d’habiter la maison
Dettes et emprunts
  • Chacun des conjoints est responsable de payer les dettes qu’elle ou il a contractées en son nom
  • Seules les dettes contractées au nom des deux personnes sont partagées
  • Chacun des conjoints est responsable de payer les dettes qu’elle ou il a contractées en son nom
  • Seules les dettes contractées au nom des deux personnes sont partagées
Prestations du Régime de pensions du Canada
  • Les crédits de pension que chaque personne a accumulés pendant l’union de fait sont partagés également, mais
  • les deux personnes doivent avoir vécu ensemble pendant un an et être séparées depuis un an
  • Un délai limite de quatre ans après la séparation s’applique au partage des crédits de pension
  • Les crédits de pension que chaque personne a accumulés pendant le mariage sont partagés également
  • Il n’y a pas de délai limite pour faire une requête de partage de crédits de pension
Pension alimentaire pour enfants
  • Chaque parent doit subvenir aux besoins des enfants de moins de 18 ans ou à ceux des enfants de plus de 18 ans qui ne peuvent pas survivre sans le soutien des parents en raison de limitations fonctionnelles
  • Les parents pourraient aussi devoir soutenir financièrement les enfants de plus de 18 ans qui sont aux études à plein temps
  • Chaque parent doit subvenir aux besoins des enfants de moins de 18 ans ou à ceux des enfants de plus de 18 ans qui ne peuvent pas survivre sans le soutien des parents en raison de limitations fonctionnelles
  • Les parents pourraient aussi devoir soutenir financièrement les enfants de plus de 18 ans qui sont aux études à plein temps
Pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint
  • Après la séparation, les deux personnes ont l’obligation de se soutenir financièrement l’une l’autre selon leurs besoins et leur capacité de payer
  • Un délai limite de deux ans après la séparation pour faire une requête de pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint
  • Après la séparation, les deux personnes ont l’obligation de se soutenir financièrement l’une l’autre selon leurs besoins et leur capacité de payer
  • Pas de délai limite pour faire une requête de pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint

Le droit à la maison où vous vivez

Le foyer conjugal, c’est toute propriété dans laquelle vit un couple et que les deux personnes utilisaient au moment de la séparation. Le foyer conjugal, c’est une maison dont une personne ou les deux personnes du couple sont propriétaires. Les lois qui traitent du foyer conjugal ne s’appliquent pas à une maison qu’un couple louait. C’est le fait que le couple soit marié ou non qui déterminera ce qu’il adviendra du foyer conjugal.

Ce que les couples mariés devraient savoir au sujet du foyer conjugal

Si un couple est marié, chaque personne a droit à la moitié de la valeur du foyer conjugal. Cela est vrai même si le titre de propriété est au nom d’une seule personne ou si une des personnes a acheté la maison avant que le couple ne se marie.

Quand un mariage prend fin, les deux personnes ont un droit égal d’habiter le foyer conjugal.

Cela signifie que vous ne pouvez pas être mise à la porte de la maison parce que vous vous séparez

Si vous ne pouvez pas vous entendre pour décider qui va habiter le foyer conjugal après la séparation, vous pouvez demander à la cour de le faire. Pour décider qui va habiter le foyer conjugal, la juge ou le juge posera les questions suivantes :

  • Combien d’argent a chacune des personnes ?
  • Le couple a-t-il des ententes écrites au sujet de la maison ?
  • Qu’est ce qui est le mieux pour les enfants ?
  • Y a-t-il d’autres endroits où pourraient vivre les conjointes ou conjoints ?
  • Y a-t-il des antécédents de violence conjugale ?

Un des conjoints ne peut pas vendre le foyer conjugal sans la permission de l’autre. Un des conjoints ne peut pas contracter une hypothèque sans la permission de l’autre. Si un des conjoints fait l’une de ces deux choses, la cour peut décider que les contrats sont illégaux.

Un couple peut avoir plus d’un foyer conjugal si, en tant que famille, ils passent beaucoup de temps à cet endroit. Un chalet, par exemple, peut être un foyer conjugal si le couple (la famille) y il passe beaucoup de temps avant la séparation.

Si un couple ne réussit pas à déterminer quel est le foyer conjugal, elles ou ils peuvent demander à la cour de décider.

Une propriété n’est plus considérée comme un foyer conjugal lorsqu’un couple obtient le divorce. Si vous êtes propriétaire d’une maison, vous devriez régler la question du partage des biens avant d’obtenir officiellement le divorce.

Ce que les couples non mariés devraient savoir au sujet du foyer conjugal

Si le couple n’est pas marié, le foyer conjugal appartient à la personne dont le nom apparaît sur le titre de propriété. Si le couple a un accord de cohabitation, il devrait indiquer qui pourra demeurer dans la maison et comment la valeur de la maison sera partagée. Dans la mesure où cet accord est légal, le couple doit en respecter les dispositions.

Si vous vivez une relation violente, vous pourriez demeurer dans la maison même si votre nom ne figure pas sur le titre de propriété. Pour cela, vous devez faire une requête pour obtenir une ordonnance de ne pas faire qui obligera l’agresseur à ne pas s’approcher de la maison. Il est très difficile d’obtenir ce type d’ordonnance. Si vous vous trouvez dans une situation semblable, vous devriez consulter une avocate ou un avocat. Voir Où trouver l’aide dont vous avez besoin.

Ce que les couples qui vivent sur une réserve devraient savoir au sujet du foyer conjugal

Si vous vivez sur une réserve autochtone, la loi ontarienne sur le foyer conjugal ne s’applique pas, c’est la Loi sur les Indiens qui s’applique. La Loi sur les Indiens ne fait aucune mention de la façon de partager les biens quand une relation prend fin. Cela signifie que les personnes mariées qui vivent sur une réserve n’ont pas automatiquement droit à la moitié de la valeur du foyer conjugal.

Le système juridique canadien ne traite pas précisément des droits inhérents des peuples autochtones à la terre. Le gouvernement fédéral a dit qu’il modifierait les lois qui touchent les droits de propriété des personnes vivant sur une réserve et permettrait aux Premières Nations de créer leurs propres lois sur la propriété et le partage de la terre et des habitations sur leurs territoires.

Pour de plus amples renseignements sur les lois touchant la propriété sur les réserves en Ontario, communiquez avec les Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto au (416) 408-3967 ou à www.aboriginallegal.ca ou encore avec la Ontario Native Women’s Association au
1-800-667-0816 ou at www.onwa-tbay.ca

Les responsabilités liées aux dettes et aux emprunts

Que vous soyez mariée ou non, vous êtes responsable des dettes que vous avez accumulées à votre nom ou des dettes que vous avez accumulées conjointement avec l’autre personne à vos deux noms.

Contracter des dettes importantes au nom de votre conjointe ou conjoint ou dans des comptes conjoints sans son consentement ou sans qu’elle ou il le sache, est une forme courante de violence économique. Voir La violence économique dans les relations, (p.11).

Au moment de la rupture, quand vous calculez le montant des biens qui seront partagés également entre les deux personnes, si vous êtes mariée, le montant des dettes de chacun sera soustrait du montant total de la valeur de ces biens.

Les droits des couples mariés en matière de biens

Par biens, on entend l’argent, les pensions, les prestations d’invalidité, les immeubles et les autres avoirs que possède un couple.

Si vous êtes mariée :

  • Les biens que vous aviez pendant le mariage doivent être divisés également
  • Si votre conjointe ou conjoint possède des biens qui ont une plus grande valeur que vos biens à vous, elle ou il doit vous donner la moitié de la différence entre les deux
  • Vous pouvez demander à la cour de décider comment les biens seront partagés. Vous devez déposer la requête dans les six ans suivant la séparation ou dans les deux ans suivant le divorce.

La loi stipule que les personnes mariées doivent partager également tous les biens que le couple a acquis au cours du mariage. Peu importe qui a payé telle ou telle chose et quel nom apparaît sur le titre de propriété. Il faut se rappeler que la valeur du foyer conjugal doit être divisée en deux parts égales même s’il appartenait à une des deux personnes avant que le couple ne se marie. Voir Le droit à la maison où vous vivez.

Il y a toutefois une exception à la règle sur le foyer conjugal : si, avant le mariage, une conjointe ou un conjoint était propriétaire d’une maison qui a été le foyer conjugal au cours du mariage et que cette maison a été vendue avant la rupture. Si le foyer conjugal a été vendu avant la fin de la relation, la conjointe ou le conjoint qui en était la ou le propriétaire peut considérer la valeur de la maison à la date du mariage comme un bien qui lui appartenait avant le mariage et ce montant n’a pas à être partagé également.

Il peut être utile de savoir comment la loi traite du partage des biens au moment de la séparation, mais ce n’est pas toujours nécessaire dépendamment de la méthode de partage des biens que vous avez choisie. Une avocate ou un avocat peut vous aider à faire le calcul.

Pour calculer comment partager également vos biens selon les dispositions de la loi, suivez les deux étapes de la formule suivante :

Étape 1 : Chaque conjointe ou conjoint doit calculer ses biens familiaux nets.

Pour déterminer ce montant, chaque conjointe ou conjoint doit additionner la valeur de tout ce qu’elle ou il possède en propre. De ce montant, elle ou il doit soustraire la valeur de ce qu’elle ou il possédait avant le mariage, de ses dettes, de tout héritage ou cadeaux reçus.

Étape 2 : Le couple doit calculer le montant du paiement d’égalisation.

Le paiement d’égalisation est un paiement que la conjointe ou le conjoint dont la somme des biens familiaux nets est la plus élevée doit faire à la conjointe ou au conjoint dont les biens familiaux nets sont les moins élevés. Le montant du paiement d’égalisation représente la moitié de la différence entre les deux montants.

Téléchargez un exemple de calcul

Quand le montant d’égalisation sera-t-il calculé autrement ?

Dans des cas particuliers, la cour peut ordonner qu’une conjointe ou un conjoint fasse un paiement d’égalisation plus élevé ou moins élevé que le calcul habituel de paiement d’égalisation. Cela peut arriver si une juge ou un juge croit que le montant du paiement d’égalisation est extrêmement injuste ou si le couple a signé un contrat de mariage ou une autre forme d’entente.

Si vous avez un contrat de mariage ou une autre entente, la cour peut ordonner que vous respectiez les dispositions du contrat à moins que le contrat soit considéré comme extrêmement injuste. La cour n’ordonnera pas que vous respectiez une entente que vous avez été forcée de signer. Si vous avez signé un contrat parce que vous avez été intimidée, que vous avez subi des pressions ou que l’on vous a menti, dites-le à la cour.

Voici les éléments qu’une juge ou un juge prendra en considération pour décider si le paiement d’égalisation est juste :

  • Une des personnes n’a pas dit à l’autre qu’elle avait des dettes au moment du mariage.
  • Une des personnes a accumulé des dettes par négligence ou dans le but avoué d’agir de façon injuste.
  • Une des personnes a réduit délibérément ses biens ou dépensé son argent avant que le couple ne se sépare.
  • Les biens familiaux nets d’une des personnes comprennent des cadeaux importants qu’elle a reçus de l’autre personne.
  • Les deux personnes ont vécu ensemble moins de cinq ans et le montant d’égalisation accorderait à l’une d’entre elles plus que sa juste part des biens.
  • Les droits des couples non mariés en matière de biens

Par « biens », on entend l’argent, les pensions, les prestations d’invalidité, les immeubles et les autres avoirs que possède un couple.

Si vous n’êtes pas mariée :

  • Vous n’avez pas automatiquement droit aux biens de votre conjointe ou conjoint
  • Vous pouvez demander à la cour d’ordonner que votre conjointe ou conjoint vous donne une partie de ses biens si vous pouvez démontrer que ce que vous avez fait pendant la relation a permis à votre conjointe ou conjoint d’acquérir ces biens ou que ce que vous avez fait en a augmenté la valeur.
  • Vous devez déposer une requête à la cour dans les deux ans suivant la séparation.

Lorsqu’un couple non marié se sépare, chaque personne garde les biens qu’elle avait avant le début de la relation et ce qu’elle a acheté pendant la relation. Seuls les biens dont les deux personnes sont propriétaires sont partagés également.

Si le couple a un accord de cohabitation, les biens seront partagés selon les dispositions de l’entente. Les couples peuvent également avoir un accord de séparation qui traite de la façon dont les biens seront partagés en cas de séparation. Voir Rédiger un accord de séparation.

Que se passe-t-il si vous ne pouvez pas vous entendre ?

Si un couple ne peut pas s’entendre sur la façon de partager les biens, il peut s’en remettre à la cour et demander à une juge ou à un juge de décider. Vous pouvez demander à la cour de vous aider à partager les biens si :

  • vous ne pouvez pas vous entendre pour partager une chose que vous et votre conjointe ou conjoint avez acheté ensemble
  • vous et votre conjointe ou conjoint aviez prévu de partager les biens qui étaient au nom d’une seule personne
  • les biens sont au nom de votre conjointe ou conjoint, mais c’est grâce à vous si votre conjointe ou conjoint a pu les acheter et vous en avez souffert sur le plan financier
  • les biens sont au nom de votre conjointe ou conjoint, mais vous avez contribué à augmenter la valeur de ces biens et que vous en avez souffert sur le plan financier

Vous devriez pouvoir obtenir une partie de la valeur des biens qui sont au nom de votre conjointe ou conjoint si vous pouvez démontrer que le travail que vous avez fait a permis à votre conjointe ou conjoint de s’enrichir, si, par exemple, vous avez travaillé à l’entreprise de votre conjointe ou conjoint ou que vous l’avez soutenu pendant ses études ou en cours de carrière.

Le travail effectué par les femmes à la maison, dont le soin des enfants, permet souvent à plusieurs couples de devenir plus riches. La cour reconnaît souvent ce travail, mais défendre sa cause en cour peut être long et c’est un processus qui coûte cher.

Si vous pensez que vous pourriez avoir droit à une partie de la valeur des biens de votre conjointe ou conjoint, parlez à une avocate ou à un avocat. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur la façon de trouver une avocate ou un avocat, voir Où trouver l’aide dont vous avez besoin.

Les droits des couples vivant sur une réserve en matière de biens

Le système juridique canadien ne traite pas précisément des droits inhérents des peuples autochtones à la terre. Les lois ontariennes sur le partage des biens ne s’appliquent pas à la terre ou aux biens sur les réserves, c’est plutôt la Loi sur les Indiens qui s’applique. La Loi sur les Indiens ne fait aucune mention de la façon de partager les biens quand une relation prend fin. Cela signifie que les personnes mariées qui vivent sur une réserve n’ont pas automatiquement droit à la moitié de la valeur du foyer conjugal.

Le gouvernement fédéral a dit qu’il modifierait les lois qui touchent les droits à la propriété des personnes vivant sur une réserve et permettrait aux Premières Nations de créer leurs propres lois sur la propriété et le partage de la terre et des habitations sur leurs territoires. Cette promesse n’a toutefois pas encore été concrétisée par une loi.

Pour de plus amples renseignements sur les lois touchant la propriété sur les réserves en Ontario, communiquez avec les Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto au (416) 408-3967 ou à www.aboriginallegal.ca ou encore avec la Ontario Native Women’s Association au
1-800-667-0816 ou www.onwa-tbay.ca

Le droit aux pensions

La valeur d’une pension est considérée comme un bien. Pour les couples mariés, les pensions doivent être inclues dans le calcul des biens familiaux nets. Aux fins du calcul des biens familiaux nets, la valeur de la pension commence à la date du mariage et se termine à la date de la séparation. Une administratrice ou un administrateur d’un régime de pension utilisera ces dates pour calculer la valeur de la pension.

Les conjointes ou conjoints peuvent décider comment partager la valeur d’une pension dans leur contrat de mariage, leur accord de cohabitation ou leur accord de séparation.

Après la séparation, le montant de la pension divisée peut être payé à la conjointe ou au conjoint par versements réguliers ou encore par un paiement forfaitaire.

Les prestations du Régime de pensions du Canada

Lorsqu’une relation prend fin, les conjointes et conjoints, qu’ils soient mariés ou non, peuvent demander le partage de leurs crédits au Régime de pensions du Canada. Les crédits au Régime de pensions que les deux personnes ont accumulés au cours du mariage ou de l’union de fait sont combinés puis divisés également entre les deux.

Les couples mariés et les couples non mariés doivent avoir vécu ensemble pendant au moins un an pour être admissibles au partage de leurs crédits du Régime de pensions du Canada.

Si vous mettez fin à une union de fait, vous devez attendre un an après la séparation pour faire une demande de partage des crédits et vous devez faire votre demande dans les quatre ans suivant la séparation.

Si vous avez été mariée et que vous vous séparez, vous devez attendre un an pour faire une demande de partage des crédits et il n’y a pas de limite de temps pour partager les crédits. Si vous êtes divorcée, vous n’avez pas de délai d’attente pour demander que vos crédits soient partagés et il n’y a pas de limite de temps pour partager les crédits.

Plus longtemps le couple aura vécu ensemble et si une des personnes gagne beaucoup plus que l’autre, plus les crédits échangés seront importants. Si vous avez moins de crédits que votre conjointe ou conjoint, la division pourrait être avantageuse. Si, par contre, vous avez plus de crédits que votre conjointe ou conjoint, la division pourrait ne pas vous avantager.

Vous pouvez faire une requête de division des crédits du Régime de pensions du Canada à un bureau de Service Canada au 1-800-277-9914 ou ATS : 1-800-255-4786.

Il y a un délai d’appel de 90 jours pour contester la division des crédits du Régime de pensions du Canada.

Les couples peuvent également être admissibles à la division des crédits d’autres types de pensions comme un régime de pension d’un employeur privé.

Les droits et les responsabilités en matière de pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint

La pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint vise à s’assurer que le montant d’argent qu’une personne paie à sa conjointe ou à son conjoint sert à l’aider à atteindre l’indépendance financière après la rupture. La pension alimentaire a pour objectif de faire partager aux deux personnes les conséquences financières de la séparation. Les personnes mariées et celles qui vivaient en union de fait ont les mêmes responsabilités en matière de pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint.

Le montant de la pension alimentaire dépend des besoins de la conjointe ou du conjoint et de ce que la conjointe ou le conjoint le plus riche peut payer. Le paiement de la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint peut se faire d’un seul coup ou par versements réguliers sur une période de temps définie ou sur une période indéfinie. Les deux personnes doivent déclarer la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint aux fins de l’impôt. La personne qui reçoit la pension alimentaire doit la déclarer comme un revenu et celle qui la paie comme une déduction.

Les couples peuvent prendre leur propre décision au sujet de la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint. Si c’est le cas, cette décision doit faire partie de leur contrat de mariage, de leur accord de cohabitation ou de leur accord de séparation. Si le couple ne réussit pas à s’entendre sur la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint, ils peuvent demander à la cour de la famille ou à une juge ou un juge de prendre la décision. Les couples non mariés ont deux ans à partir de la séparation pour faire une requête à la cour pour obtenir une ordonnance de pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint. Les couples mariés n’ont pas de limite de temps pour demander à la cour une ordonnance de pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint.

Comment calculer la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint

Lorsqu’un couple demande à la cour de prendre une décision sur la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint, la juge ou le juge analysera leurs finances. Chacun des conjoints devra présenter des documents pour démontrer quelle est sa situation financière. Ces renseignements peuvent inclure des déclarations d’impôt personnel, des bordereaux de paie, des relevés d’aide sociale ou toute autre preuve de revenu ainsi que la liste des avoirs et des dépenses de chaque personne.

Lorsqu’un couple demande à la cour de déterminer le montant d’une pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint, la juge ou le juge doit prendre en considération les éléments suivants :

  • La durée du mariage ou de l’union de fait
  • La somme que gagne ou pourrait gagner chaque personne
  • L’âge et l’état de santé de chaque personne
  • La capacité d’une des personnes de soutenir la carrière de l’autre
  • Ce qu’a fait une des personnes pour soutenir la carrière de l’autre
  • Le temps et les efforts consacrés par une personne pour prendre soin des enfants au cours de la relation
  • La façon dont les responsabilités de chaque personne dans la relation ont touché sa capacité à avoir un revenu

En général, la juge ou le juge ne se concentrera pas sur d’autres aspects de la relation. Si, par exemple, un des conjoints a été violent ou infidèle, cela n’influencera pas le montant de la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint que la cour ordonnera.

Pour déterminer quel sera un montant raisonnable de pension alimentaire, la plupart des juges et des avocates et avocats consulteront les Lignes directrices facultatives en matière de pensions alimentaires pour époux du gouvernement fédéral. Ces lignes directrices proposent une formule générale pour calculer la pension alimentaire et suggèrent une durée pendant laquelle la pension devrait être payée. Elles suggèrent également une échelle de montants que les juges peuvent prendre en considération pour comparer la différence entre le revenu net de chacune des personnes ainsi que la durée du mariage ou de l’union de fait. Plus la différence est grande entre les revenus des deux personnes et plus le couple a été marié ou a vécu ensemble longtemps, plus le montant de la pension alimentaire pourrait être élevé et plus il devrait être payé longtemps. Chaque situation est différente et les juges prennent leurs décisions sur la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint en étudiant spécifiquement chaque cas.

Les ordonnances de pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint peuvent être modifiées après six mois si les conditions de vie de l’une des personnes ont changé considérablement. Les motifs suivants pourraient être suffisants pour modifier un changement de la pension alimentaire :

  • Si votre revenu est beaucoup plus élevé ou beaucoup plus bas qu’au moment où l’ordonnance a été émise
  • Si le revenu de votre conjointe ou conjoint est beaucoup plus élevé ou beaucoup plus bas qu’au moment où l’ordonnance a été émise
  • Si l’une des deux personnes se remarie
  • Si l’une des deux personnes prend sa retraite
  • Si l’une des deux personnes est devenue handicapée et qu’elle a besoin de plus de soutien ou si une personne a seulement les moyens de payer une pension moins élevée
  • Si le coût de la vie a changé considérablement depuis que l’ordonnance a été émise

Ummni and Jen

Ummni et Jen vivent ensemble depuis cinq ans et sont mariées depuis deux ans. Jen travaille à temps partiel et c’est elle qui effectue la majeure partie des tâches ménagères. Ummni travaille à plein temps et elle gagne presque le double de la rémunération de Jen. Elles vivent dans une maison dont Ummni était propriétaire avant qu’elles ne forment un couple. Ummni trouve que Jen ne la traite pas bien et elle pense que Jen l’a trompée. Ummni décide de rompre, elle veut que Jen quitte la maison et elle est prête à lui payer une pension alimentaire pour conjointe. Mais parce qu’elles sont mariées, la maison leur appartient à toutes les deux à part égale et parce que Ummni gagne plus d’argent que Jen, Ummni devra probablement lui payer une pension alimentaire malgré le fait que Jen l’a trompée.

La loi ontarienne stipule que la pension alimentaire pour enfants a la priorité sur la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint. Cela signifie que si une personne n’a pas les moyens de payer une pension alimentaire pour enfants et une pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint, il se pourrait qu’elle n’ait à payer que la pension alimentaire pour enfants. Quand son obligation de payer une pension alimentaire pour enfants aura pris fin, la cour pourrait ordonner que la personne paie une pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint.

Les droits et les responsabilités en matière de pension alimentaire pour enfants

En Ontario, les lois qui régissent la pension alimentaire pour enfants sont les mêmes pour les couples mariés et pour ceux qui vivent en union de fait et pour tous les parents d’enfants qu’elles ou ils aient vécu ensemble ou non.

Les personnes qui ne sont pas parents mais qui, avec le temps, ont démontré qu’elles avaient l’intention d’agir comme des parents, pourraient également être tenues responsables de la pension alimentaire pour enfants.

Tous les parents doivent subvenir aux besoins de leurs enfants jusqu’à ce qu’elles ou ils aient 18 ans. Si une ou un enfant se marie ou quitte la maison, même avant l’âge de 18 ans, les parents n’ont plus la responsabilité de subvenir à ses besoins. Par contre, une juge ou un juge peut ordonner qu’un parent continue à subvenir aux besoins d’une ou d’un enfant de plus de 18 ans si elle ou il étudie à temps plein, est malade ou vit avec des limitations fonctionnelles.

La responsabilité de subvenir aux besoins d’une ou d’un enfant de plus de 18 ans dépend de choses comme la relation de l’enfant avec le parent payeur et la situation financière de l’enfant et du parent payeur.

Les parents doivent subvenir aux besoins de leurs enfants même si :

  • elles ou ils ne vivent pas avec leurs enfants
  • elles ou ils ne sont pas mariés avec l’autre parent
  • elles ou ils n’ont jamais vécu avec l’autre parent

Parmi les adultes qui doivent subvenir aux besoins des enfants, on retrouve :

  • la mère ou le père biologique
  • un parent qui a adopté une ou un enfant
  • la nouvelle conjointe ou le nouveau conjoint d’un des parents qui, avec le temps, a démontré qu’elle ou il voulait agir comme un parent
  • Une ou un autre adulte qui, avec le temps, a démontré qu’elle ou il voulait agir comme un parent

Les parents qui vivent avec les enfants et qui en prennent soin ont le droit de recevoir une pension alimentaire pour enfants de l’autre parent ou des autres parents. Si les enfants passent autant de temps avec chacun de leurs parents, le parent qui a le revenu le plus élevé pourrait avoir à payer une pension alimentaire pour enfants à l’autre parent.

Le montant de la pension alimentaire pour enfants qu’un parent doit payer est établi par les Lignes directrices sur les pensions alimentaires pour enfants des gouvernements de l’Ontario et du Canada. Le montant de pension qu’un parent doit payer dépend de son revenu et du nombre d’enfants visés par la pension. Le tableau suivant donne un aperçu des montants établis par les lignes directrices.

Exemples de lignes directrices de montants pour la pension alimentaire pour enfants

Revenu du parent payeur Montant de la pension alimentaire à payer chaque mois
1 enfant 2 enfants 3 enfants
15,000 $ 97 $ 195 $ 210 $
20,000 $ 160 $ 306 $ 404 $
25,000 $ 200 $ 373 $ 511 $
30,000 $ 245 $ 438 $ 591 $
35,000 $ 303 $ 508 $ 685 $
40,000 $ 360 $ 579 $ 764 $
45,000 $ 406 $ 664 $ 858 $
50,000 $ 450 $ 743 $ 959 $
55,000 $ 498 $ 817 $ 1068 $
60,000 $ 546 $ 892 $ 1168 $
65,000 $ 594 $ 966 $ 1264 $

Il est à noter que le tableau montre des exemples des Lignes directrices ontariennes. Pour calculer le montant de pension alimentaire pour enfants qui s’applique à votre situation, consultez le site Web du gouvernement fédéral.

Si les parents ne peuvent pas s’entendre sur la pension alimentaire pour enfants — le montant, qui paiera la pension ou quelles seront les modalités de la pension — ils peuvent demander à la cour qu’une juge ou un juge prenne la décision. Voir S’en remettre à la cour.

Il arrive parfois que la cour ordonne à un parent de payer un montant de pension alimentaire moindre que celui que suggèrent les Lignes directrices sur les pensions alimentaires pour enfants si :

  • l’enfant a plus de 18 ans
  • l’enfant passe autant de temps avec chacun de ses parents
  • chaque parent a au moins la garde d’une ou d’un enfant
  • le parent payeur prouve que le fait de payer davantage de pension alimentaire serait pour elle ou pour lui un fardeau financier excessif

Les montants établis par les lignes directrices ont pour but de payer les dépenses de base. La cour pourrait décider qu’un parent devrait payer plus que le montant établi par les lignes directrices s’il y a des dépenses supplémentaires à payer. Ces dépenses supplémentaires incluent des choses comme une assurance médicale, des frais de garderie, des frais de soins de santé et des dépenses pour l’éducation des enfants. Les dépenses supplémentaires sont généralement assumées par les deux parents en fonction de leur revenu respectif.

Sophie et Martin

Sophie et Martin sortent ensemble à l’occasion depuis un certain temps. Après quelques mois de fréquentations, ils ont un enfant. Leur fille vit avec Sophie et Martin la voit toutes les semaines. Parce que Martin gagne 45 000 $ par année, les Lignes directrices sur les pensions alimentaires pour enfants exigent qu’il paie 415 $ par mois à Sophie en pension alimentaire.

Après six mois de paiement d’une pension alimentaire pour enfants, un des parents peut demander à la cour de la modifier. Elles ou ils peuvent demander une modification si leur revenu s’est accru ou a diminué ou si le coût du soin des enfants a augmenté.

Comment sont appliquées les ordonnances de pension alimentaire

En Ontario, c’est le Bureau des obligations familiales (BOF), un organisme gouvernemental, qui fait appliquer les ordonnances de pension alimentaire. Lorsqu’une cour ordonne à une personne de payer une pension alimentaire pour enfants ou pour conjointe ou conjoint, l’ordonnance est automatiquement déposée au BOF. Si un couple donne au BOF une copie de son accord de séparation, le BOF fera appliquer les ordonnances même si le couple s’est séparé sans se présenter en cour. Voir Rédiger un accord de séparation.

Le BOF recueille les paiements des personnes qui doivent payer une pension alimentaire pour enfants ou pour conjointe ou conjoint et, une fois l’argent recueilli, transmet le paiement à l’autre personne. Pour de plus amples renseignements au sujet du BOF, consultez le www.ontario.ca/FRO or call 1-800-267-4330 ou appelez le 1-800-­267-4330.

Si le payeur ne paie pas la pension alimentaire, le BOF peut récupérer l’argent auprès de son employeur. Le BOF peut également saisir le compte de banque du payeur ou enregistrer un privilège sur une chose qu’il possède. Si le BOF découvre que le payeur tente d’éviter de payer en cachant l’argent, il peut obliger une autre personne avec qui il est lié financièrement à faire les paiements de pension alimentaire. Cette personne peut être une nouvelle conjointe ou un nouveau conjoint ou encore un membre de la famille avec qui le payeur partage les dépenses. Le BOF peut également récupérer les sommes dues en pension alimentaire à même l’argent que doit le gouvernement au payeur.

Le BOF peut récupérer de l’argent d’un payeur qui ne vit pas en Ontario. Il a le pouvoir de faire appliquer les ordonnances partout au Canada et aux États-Unis ainsi que dans plusieurs autres pays.

Si le payeur ne paie pas la pension alimentaire, le BOF peut suspendre son permis de conduire, son permis de chasse ou de pêche ou son passeport. Lorsqu’une personne refuse de payer une pension alimentaire, elle peut être condamnée à la prison pour 180 jours.

Si une personne n’a pas payé la pension alimentaire depuis des années, vous pouvez demander à la cour d’ordonner des paiements rétroactifs d’arriérés de pension alimentaire, Voir S’en remettre à la cour.

Comment faire appliquer les ordonnances de pension alimentaire sur une réserve

Le Bureau des obligations familiales (BOF) fait appliquer les ordonnances de pension alimentaire pour les membres des Premières Nations et les Indiennes ou Indiens inscrits. Le BOF ne peut saisir les paiements de pension alimentaire sur les biens détenus sur une réserve et sur les revenus provenant d’une réserve que si la personne qui reçoit le paiement est également une ou un membre des Premières Nations ou encore une Indienne ou un Indien inscrit.

Le BOF ne peut pas saisir les paiements à partir de biens ou de revenus sur une réserve si la conjointe ou le conjoint qui reçoit la pension alimentaire n’est pas membre d’une Première Nation ou n’est pas une Indienne ou un Indien inscrit. Par contre, dans de tels cas, le BOF peut saisir le salaire du payeur si l’employeur de ce dernier ne se trouve pas sur une réserve ou enregistrer un privilège sur tout bien personnel hors réserve, suspendre le permis de conduire du payeur ou lui ordonner de se présenter en cour.

Pour de plus amples renseignements au sujet du Bureau des obligations familiales, consultez le www.ontario.ca/FRO ou appelez au 1-800-267-4330.