Frequently Asked Questions / Questions fréquemment posées

Frequently Asked Questions
Questions fréquemment posées
Frequently Asked Questions about Money, Relationships and the Law in Ontario
When do laws dealing with money treat married couples and unmarried couples differently?
Many laws affect the financial rights and responsibilities of couples. Some of these laws apply differently to married couples tha…
Questions fréquemment posées sur l’argent, les relations et la loi en Ontario
Quand les lois qui régissent l’argent traitent-elles différemment les couples mariés et les couples qui vivent en union de fait ?
Plusieurs lois touchent les droits et les responsabilités économiques des co…

Frequently Asked Questions about Money, Relationships and the Law in Ontario

When do laws dealing with money treat married couples and unmarried couples differently?

Many laws affect the financial rights and responsibilities of couples. Some of these laws apply differently to married couples than to couples that aren’t married. For example, the law says that married couples have to divide their property equally when they separate regardless of what each person owns. The law doesn’t require unmarried couples to equally split their property.

For more information about how laws affect married and unmarried couples differently, see When the relationship ends: Know your rights and responsibilities.

When is my partner considered my common-law spouse?

Different laws in Ontario define common-law spouses differently. Some laws require you to live with your partner for 3 months or 1 year and other laws require you to live with your partner for 3 years.

For a detailed comparison of how different laws define common-law or unmarried spouses, see Know how the law defines married and unmarried spouses.

Where can I get help if my partner is abusive?

There are many different services and organizations in Ontario that can help women who are experiencing abuse. Ontario Works also offers women financial support if they are leaving an abusive partner.

Contact the Assaulted Women’s Helpline for more information or see the table above.

How can I protect my rights before moving in with my partner?

It is important to plan ahead and talk to your partner when entering a new relationship. One way to protect your interests is for you and your partner to sign a cohabitation agreement or a marriage contract.

For more information about these agreements and what they should include, see Talk to your partner and create your own agreement.

How can I protect my rights when I’m separating from my partner?

It is important to know what you are entitled to when breaking up with a partner. Once you know your rights, there are many different ways to settle the legal issues between you. What is right for you will depend on your individual situation. Some couples may choose to resolve their issues without using the legal system, while other couples will go to court to settle their issues.

For more information see When the relationship ends: protect your interests.

Do same-sex partners have the same rights as opposite-sex partners?

Yes. Same-sex partners, or gay couples, whether married or unmarried, have all the same rights and responsibilities as opposite-sex couples, or straight couples that are married or unmarried.

How do we divide our property and money if our relationship ends?

The law in Ontario dealing with the division of property when couples break up is different for married couples than it is for unmarried couples. Married couples have to split all of the property and money they’ve acquired since they have been married. Generally couples that aren’t married don’t have to divide their property equally. Ontario property laws don’t apply to people living on First Nation reserves.

For more information see When the relationship ends, know your rights and responsibilities.

Can I get child support from my kid’s other parent?

Under Ontario law, every parent is financially responsible for their children under the age of 18, and sometimes even longer if the child is in school or has special health needs. The parent who lives with the children has the right to child support from the other parent. If a child lives some of the time with both parents, the parent who makes the most money may have to pay child support to the other parent. The law sets out the amount of child support to be paid.

For more information, see Rights and responsibilities for child support.

Can I get spousal support from my former partner?

The law in Ontario requires both married and unmarried couples to help each other be financially independent when they break up. Unmarried spouses have to live together for 3 years in order to owe each other support when their relationship ends. The amount of spousal support one person has to pay depends on what the dependant spouse needs and what the wealthier spouse can pay.

For more information, see Rights and responsibilities for spousal support.

What if my partner cheated on me or treated me badly?

The law about money and relationships in Ontario doesn’t generally change if one person in a couple treated the other badly. For example, the amount of spousal support or child support that you are entitled to doesn’t change if your partner lies to you or cheats on you.

However, a judge may create exceptions in property division and spousal support if one person is hiding money or lying about their assets to avoid paying the other person after they break up. If you believe this is the case, you should contact a lawyer.

Judges can also grant exceptions to property division and support can also be granted if your former partner is abusive. If you are dealing with an abusive person, you should consult a lawyer. For confidential support, and to find help in your area call the Assaulted Women’s Helpline at 1-866-863-0511 or TTY: 1-866-863-7868.

Can I continue to live in my home if my relationship ends?

Who continues to live in the home will depend on whose name is on the lease or the deed, and whether or not the couple is married.

When couples are married, the family home legally belongs to both spouses no matter whose name is on the deed. Both spouses have an equal right to live in the home when a marriage ends, and if the couple can’t decide who will live there, they can ask a judge to decide.

If a couple is not married the person whose name is on the lease or the deed will have a right to the home. However, women who are victims of abuse can apply to stay in the home even when the home is not in their name.

For more information, see Rights to the home where you live.

Do I need a lawyer if my relationship ends?

When couples separate, they do not always need a lawyer to settle the issues between them. However, it is useful to have a lawyer help you understand your rights and responsibilities.

Family Law Information Centres can provide free legal advice on certain family law issues and can help people find a family law lawyer.

See the tables on this page for information about Legal Aid Ontario, and Family Law Information Centres.

Questions fréquemment posées sur l’argent, les relations et la loi en Ontario

Quand les lois qui régissent l’argent traitent-elles différemment les couples mariés et les couples qui vivent en union de fait ?

Plusieurs lois touchent les droits et les responsabilités économiques des couples. Certaines de ces lois s’appliquent différemment aux couples mariés et à ceux qui ne le sont pas. La loi stipule, par exemple, que les couples mariés doivent partager les biens également lorsqu’ils se séparent, quelle que soit la personne qui en est propriétaire. La loi n’exige pas que les couples qui vivent en union de fait partagent également leurs biens.

Pour de plus amples renseignements sur les lois qui touchent différemment les couples mariés et les couples qui vivent en union de fait, voir Vos droits et vos responsabilités quand la relation prend fin.

Quand la loi considère-t-elle ma conjointe ou mon conjoint comme une conjointe ou un conjoint de fait ?

Les différentes lois ontariennes définissent les conjointes et conjoints de fait différemment. Certaines lois exigent que vous ayez vécu ensemble pendant trois mois ou un an et d’autres que vous viviez ensemble depuis trois ans.

Pour une comparaison détaillée sur les différences dans la définition de conjointe ou conjoint de fait dans les diverses lois, voir Comment la loi définit le mariage et les conjointes et conjoints de fait.

Où trouver de l’aide si ma conjointe ou mon conjoint fait preuve de violence envers moi ?

Il existe divers services et organismes ontariens qui peuvent aider les femmes qui sont touchées par la violence. Ontario au travail peut offrir du soutien financier aux femmes qui quittent une conjointe ou un conjoint violent.

Communiquez avec la Ligne de soutien Fem’aide pour de plus amples renseignements ou voir Où trouver l’aide dont vous avez besoin.

Comment puis-je protéger mes droits avant d’emménager avec une conjointe ou un conjoint ?

Il est important de prévoir à l’avance et d’en parler avec votre conjointe ou conjoint avant de vivre ensemble. Une des façons de protéger vos intérêts est de faire un accord de cohabitation ou un contrat de mariage.

Pour de plus amples renseignements sur ces ententes et sur ce qu’elles devraient contenir, voir Parlez avec votre conjointe ou conjoint et créez votre propre entente.

Comment puis-je protéger mes droits quand je me sépare de ma conjointe ou de mon conjoint ?

Il est important de savoir à quoi vous avez droit quand vous vous séparez. Une fois que vous connaissez vos droits, il y plusieurs différentes façons de régler les choses entre vous. Ce qui sera bon pour vous dépendra de votre propre situation. Certains couples pourraient choisir de résoudre les questions liées à la séparation sans avoir recours au système judiciaire tandis que d’autres s’en remettront à la cour pour régler leurs affaires.

Pour de plus amples renseignements voir Protéger vos intérêts quand la relation prend fin.

Est-ce que les couples de même sexe ont les mêmes droits que les couples de sexe opposé ?

Oui, les couples de même sexe ou les couples de gays ou de lesbiennes, qu’ils soient mariés ou non, ont les mêmes droits et les mêmes responsabilités que les couples de sexe opposé ou couples hétérosexuels qui sont mariés ou qui vivent en union de fait.

Comment partager les biens et l’argent quand la relation prend fin ?

La loi ontarienne sur le partage des biens au moment de la rupture n’est pas la même si les personnes sont mariées ou si elles vivent en union de fait. Les couples mariés doivent partager en deux parts égales les biens et l’argent qu’ils ont acquis depuis le mariage. En général, les couples qui ne sont pas mariés n’ont pas à partager leurs biens également. Les lois ontariennes sur le partage des biens ne s’appliquent pas aux personnes qui vivent dans une réserve des Premières nations.

Pour de plus amples renseignements, voir Vos droits et vos responsabilités quand la relation prend fin.

Puis-je obtenir une pension alimentaire pour enfants de l’autre parent de mes enfants ?

En vertu de la loi ontarienne, tout parent est financièrement responsable de ses enfants jusqu’à l’âge de 18 ans et parfois plus longtemps si l’enfant est encore aux études ou si elle ou il a des besoins spéciaux en matière de santé. Le parent qui vit avec les enfants a le droit de recevoir une pension alimentaire pour enfants de l’autre parent. Si un enfant vit une partie du temps avec chacun de ses parents, le parent qui a le meilleur revenu pourrait avoir à payer une pension alimentaire à l’autre parent. C’est la loi qui détermine quel sera le montant de la pension alimentaire pour enfants qui devra être payée.

Pour de plus amples renseignements, voir Les droits et les responsabilités en matière de pension alimentaire pour enfants.

Puis-je obtenir une pension alimentaire pour conjointe de mon ex-conjointe ou de mon ex-conjoint ?

La loi ontarienne exige que les couples mariés et ceux qui ne le sont pas s’aident mutuellement à atteindre l’indépendance financière après la rupture. Pour que cette loi s’applique, les personnes non mariées doivent avoir vécu ensemble pendant au moins trois ans. Le montant de la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint dépend des besoins de la personne à charge et de ce que peut payer la personne la plus riche.

Pour de plus amples renseignements, voir Les droits et les responsabilités en matière de pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint.

Qu’arrive-t-il si ma conjointe ou mon conjoint a été infidèle ou m’a maltraitée ?

En général, les lois ontariennes qui régissent l’argent et les relations ne changent pas si une personne du couple a maltraité l’autre. Le montant de la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint auquel vous avez droit, par exemple, ne changera pas si votre conjointe ou conjoint vous ment ou est infidèle.

Par contre, une juge ou un juge pourrait faire des exceptions dans le partage des biens ou la pension alimentaire pour conjointe ou conjoint si une personne a caché de l’argent ou a menti au sujet de ses avoirs pour éviter de partager ses biens avec l’autre au moment de la rupture. Si vous croyez que c’est le cas, vous devriez communiquer avec une avocate ou un avocat.

Les juges peuvent également faire des exceptions dans le partage des biens et pourraient vous accorder une pension alimentaire si votre ex-conjointe ou ex-conjoint fait preuve de violence à votre égard. Si vous traitez avec une personne violente, vous devriez consulter une avocate ou un avocat. Pour obtenir de l’aide et du soutien dans votre région, communiquez avec la Ligne de soutien Fem’aide au 1-877-336-2333 ou ATS : 1-866-860-7082.

Puis-je continuer à habiter dans ma maison après la séparation ?

La décision d’habiter dans la maison est déterminée par le nom qui apparaît sur le titre de propriété et par le fait que le couple était marié ou vivait en union de fait.

Quand les couples sont mariés, le foyer conjugal appartient légalement aux deux personnes, quel que soit le nom qui apparaît sur le titre de propriété de la maison. Les deux personnes ont un droit égal d’habiter dans la maison une fois que le mariage a pris fin et, si le couple ne peut pas décider qui habitera la maison, il peut demander à une juge ou à un juge de prendre la décision.

Si le couple n’est pas marié, la personne dont le nom apparaît sur le titre de propriété a droit à la maison. Les femmes qui sont victimes de violence peuvent toutefois faire une requête pour demeurer dans le foyer conjugal même si la maison n’est pas à leur nom.

Pour de plus amples renseignements, voir Le droit à la maison où vous vivez.

Ai-je besoin d’une avocate ou d’un avocat au moment où ma relation prend fin ?

Lorsque les couples se séparent, ils n’ont pas toujours besoin d’une avocate ou d’un avocat pour régler les choses entre eux. Il est toutefois utile de demander à une avocate ou à un avocat de vous aider à bien comprendre vos droits et vos responsabilités.

Les centres d’information sur le droit de la famille peuvent donner des conseils juridiques gratuits sur certaines questions de droit de la famille et peuvent vous aider à trouver une avocate ou un avocat.

Voir Où trouver l’aide dont vous avez besoin pour de plus amples renseignements sur Aide juridique Ontario et les centres d’information sur le droit de la famille.